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Indiana Free Printable  for 2021 Indiana Part-Year and Full-Year Nonresident Income Tax Instruction Booklet

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Part-Year and Full-Year Nonresident Income Tax Instruction Booklet
IT-40PNR Booklet

INDIANA 2 0 2 0 IT-40PNR Part-Year and Full-Year Nonresident Individual Income Tax Booklet freefile.dor.in.gov FAST • FRIENDLY • FREE 12/20 Update • See Returned Checks and Other Types of Payments penalty update on page 12. WAIT! YOU MAY QUALIFY FOR FREE ONLINE TAX FILING! More than 85 percent of Indiana taxpayers filed electronically in 2019. Consider the benefits of filing electronically: • Faster Refund. Electronic filing reduces errors and expedites refund time – within 10 to 14 days (compared with 10 to 12 weeks for a paper return). • Fewer Errors. Up to 20 percent of paper-filed returns have errors, which can result in delays and possible penalty and/or interest for the taxpayer. Returns filed electronically, however, are 98 percent accurate. • Easier Filing. You won’t have to complete the many complicated forms in this booklet. Instead, you go online, answer some easy questions, and before you know it your taxes are complete. You may be eligible to file your taxes online for FREE with INfreefile. Go to www.freefile.dor.in.gov to see if you qualify or learn more about INfreefile on page 4. SP 258 (R18 / 9-20) Page 2 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Which Indiana Tax Form Should You File? • Indiana has three different individual income tax returns. Read the following to find the right one for you. • Form IT-40 for Full-Year Residents Credits Use Form IT-40 if you (and your spouse, if married filing jointly) were full-year Indiana residents. • Form IT-40PNR for Part-Year and Full-Year Nonresidents • Use Form IT-40PNR if you (and/or your spouse, if married filing jointly): • Were Indiana residents for less than a full-year or not at all, or • Are filing jointly and one was a full-year Indiana resident and the other was not a full-year Indiana resident, and • Do not qualify to file Form IT-40RNR. Form IT-40RNR for Full-Year Residents of Reciprocal States Use Form IT-40RNR if you (and your spouse, if married filing jointly) were: • Full-year residents of Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin, and • The only type of income from Indiana was from wage, tip, salary or other compensation*. • • • Note. If you have income that is being taxed by both Indiana and another state, you may have to file a tax return with the other state. • 2020 Changes Update: Line 36A of Form IT-40PNR, Schedule A, assumes conformity with the Internal Revenue Code for federal changes adopted after Jan. 1, 2020. If the 2021 Indiana General Assembly does not conform to the most current changes to the Internal Revenue Code, you may have to amend your tax return at a later date to reflect any differences between Indiana and federal law. You may wish to periodically check the department’s homepage at www.in.gov/dor for updates. Add-backs • The portion of wagering taxes required to be added back as a tax based on or measured by income is being phased out. See instructions. Page 3 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Tax on the Military Retirement Income and/or Survivor’s Benefits is being phased out. See instructions on page 26 to figure your deduction. Federal Adjustments to Income – Indiana Schedule A Reporting • See the instructions on page 7 to determine which form to file. Military personnel stationed in a combat zone should see the instructions on page 7 for extensions of time to file procedures. Married individuals who file separately are now eligible to claim Indiana’s CollegeChoice 529 Educational Savings Plan credit. See Schedule IN-529 for more information. Redevelopment Tax Credit. You may be eligible for a credit if you made a qualified investment for the redevelopment or rehabilitation of real property located within a qualified redevelopment site. See page 53 for more information. School Scholarship Tax Credit Contribution Ceiling Increased. The total of allowable net contributions to the program has increased to $16.5 million for the program’s fiscal year of July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021. Venture Capital Investment Credit reporting change. This credit must be reported on Schedule IN-OCC. See instructions. Deductions *You are required to file Form IT-40PNR if you have any other kind of Indiana-source income. Military Personnel The deferral of business indebtedness discharge and reacquisition add-back (107) is no longer available. A new conformity add-back (147) is available for negative entries. See page 19 for more information. Charitable contributions reported on federal Form 1040/1040SR, line 10b. See reporting instructions for Indiana Schedule A, line 34 on page 17. Excess deduction upon termination of a trust reported on federal Form 1040/1040-SR, Schedule 1, line 22. See reporting instructions for Indiana Schedule A, line 34 on page 17. Miscellaneous • • Amended check box added. See the instructions on page 4 if you are amending (updating) your 2020 individual income tax return. Injured spouse or spouse who claims to not be liable for all or part of a tax liability. if you are married filing jointly and want to file with one of these designations, see Schedule H, line 4 instructions on page 62. Need Tax Forms or Information Bulletins? Use Your Personal Computer Visit our website and download the forms you need. Our address is www.in.gov/dor. Need help with your return? Local Help You may be eligible to take advantage of the IRS Volunteer Return Preparation Program (VRPP). This program offers free tax return help to low income, elderly and special needs individuals. Volunteers will fill out federal and state forms for those who qualify. Call the IRS at (800) 829-1040 to find the nearest VRPP location. Be sure to take your W-2s and 1099s with you. Our Website Our website offers tax filing options, downloadable blank forms and instructions, information bulletins, an online helpdesk, helpful email links, and a calendar with filing due dates. Visit the department’s website at www.in.gov/dor, Moving? You need to contact the department if you move to a new address after filing your tax return. If you need help deciding which form to file, or to get information bulletins or policy directives on specific topics, visit our website at www.in.gov/dor. Change your address with us by doing one of the following: You need to notify the department if you move to a new address after filing your tax return. Change your address with us by doing one of the following: • Complete the Individual Address Change form (www.in.gov/dor/ individual-income-taxes/change-my-address) and fax it to 317615-2608. • Mail the request, including your Social Security number, old address, new address and signature, to Indiana Department of Revenue, P.O. Box 6197, Indianapolis, IN 46206-6197. • Visit one of our District Offices (find locations here: www.in.gov/ dor/contact-us/district-office-contact-info/) in person. Make sure to bring your Social Security number, old address, and new address with you. Telephone Filing an Amended (Corrected) Tax Return Automated Information Line Call the automated information line at (317) 233-4018 to get the status of your refund, billing and payment plan information, a copy of your tax return, or prerecorded tax topics. If you wish to check for billing information, be sure to have a copy of your tax notice. The system will ask you to enter the tax identification number shown on the notice. If you have a rotary phone, please call (317) 232-2240, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday, and a representative will help you. Internet Address Call us at (317) 232-2240 Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., for help with basic tax questions. Ready to file your return? Use an Electronic Filing Program More than 85% of Hoosier taxpayers used an electronic filing program to file their 2019 state and federal individual income tax returns. Electronic filing provides Indiana taxpayers the opportunity to file their federal and state tax returns immediately, and receive their Indiana refunds in about half the time it takes to process a paper return. It takes even less time if you use direct deposit, which deposits your refund directly into your bank account. Even if there is an amount due on either return, Indiana taxpayers can still file electronically and feel comfortable knowing that the returns were received by the IRS and the Indiana Department of Revenue (DOR). Use an electronic vendor or contact your tax preparer to see if he or she provides this service. INfreefile This tax season Indiana continues to offer a free tax filing service through the cooperation of the Free File Alliance. Eligible Indiana taxpayers can file both the federal and Indiana individual tax returns using highly interactive and easy-to-use webbased applications that speed both returns and refunds. You can choose from a list of multiple vendors that provide this free service. The department estimates nearly 2 million Indiana taxpayers are eligible for this free service. See if you are eligible to participate by visiting www.freefile.dor.in.gov. Page 4 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Did you receive a lateW-2 or other kind of income statement after you filed? Did you forget to claim an exemption or deduction? If you need to amend (correct) your 2020 tax return: • Complete a corrected 2020 Form IT-40PNR, including any schedules that have been changed, • Place an X in the box if amending (located in the upper righthand corner of the Form IT-40PNR), and • Attach a completed Form IT-40 X. The Form IT-40PNR, IT-40X and supporting schedules are located at www.in.gov/dor/tax-forms/2020-individual-income-tax-forms. Annual Public Hearing In accordance with the Indiana Taxpayer Bill of Rights, the department will conduct an annual public hearing in Indianapolis in June of 2021. Event details will be listed at www.in.gov/dor/ news-media-and-publications/dor-public-events/annual-publichearings/. Please come and share feedback or comments about how the department can better administer Indiana tax laws. If not able to attend, please submit feedback or comments in writing to: Indiana Department of Revenue, Commissioner’s Office, MS# 101, 100 N. Senate Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46204. Our homepage provides access to forms, information bulletins and directives, tax publications, email, and various filing options. Visit www.in.gov/dor. Before You Begin • Married persons who live apart filing status If you were not divorced or legally separated in 2020, you may have qualified for and filed as ‘head of household’ on your federal income tax return. If you did, do not check the married filing separately box. Also, do not enter either your spouse’s name or Social Security number. • Same-sex married tax filing guidelines Couples in same-sex marriages should file their taxes with Indiana using the same married filing status as they used for federal tax filing purposes (see above). Important. You must complete your federal tax return first. Filling in the Boxes – Please Use Ink If you are filling out the form by hand, please use black or blue ink and print your letters and numbers neatly. If you do not have an entry for a particular line, leave it blank. Do not use dashes, zeros or other symbols to indicate that you have no entry for that line. Social Security Number Be sure to enter your 9-digit Social Security number in the boxes at the top of the form. If filing a joint return, enter your Social Security number in the first set of boxes and your spouse’s 9-digit Social Security number in the second set of boxes. An incorrect or missing Social Security number can increase your tax due, reduce your refund, or delay timely processing of your filing. Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) If you already have an ITIN, enter it wherever your Social Security number is requested on your tax return. If you are in the process of applying for an ITIN, check the box located directly beneath the Social Security number area at the top of the form. For information on how to get an ITIN, contact the IRS at (800) 829-3676 and request federal Form W-7, or find it online at www.irs.gov. Name and Suffix Please use all capital letters when entering your information. For example, Jim Smith Junior should be entered as JIM SMITH JR. Name. If your last name includes an apostrophe, do not use it. For example, enter O’Shea as OSHEA. If your name includes a hyphen, use it. For example, enter SMITH-JONES. Suffix. Enter the suffix associated with your name in the appropriate box. • Use JR for junior and SR for senior. • Numeric characters must be replaced by Roman Numerals. For example, if your last name is Charles 3rd, do not use 3rd; instead, enter III in the suffix field. • Do not enter any titles or designations, such as M.D., Ph. D., RET., Minor or DEC’D. Married Filing Requirements • Married filing jointly If you filed your federal income tax return as married filing jointly, you must also file as married filing jointly with Indiana. • Married filing separately If you file your federal income tax return as married, filing separately, you must also file married, filing separately with Indiana. Enter both of your Social Security numbers in the boxes on the top of the form, and then check the box directly to the right of those boxes. Enter the name of the person filing the return on the top line, but do not enter the spouse’s name on the second name line. Page 5 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Military Address Overseas military addresses must contain the APO, FPO designation in the “city field” along with a two-character “state” abbreviation of AE, AP, or AA and the zip code. Place these two- and three-letter designations in the city name area. Zip/Postal Code Enter your five or nine digit Zip code (do not use a dash). For example, enter 46217 or 462174540. If filing with a foreign address, enter the associated postal code. Foreign Country Code Complete this area if the address you are using is located in a foreign country. Enter the 2-character foreign country code, which may be found online at www.in.gov/dor/legal-resources/tax-library/foreigncountry-code-listing. County Information Enter the two-digit code numbers for the county(s) where you and your spouse, if filing joint, lived and worked on Jan. 1, 2020. You can find these code numbers on the chart on the back of Schedule CT-40PNR. See the instructions beginning on page 63 for more information, including the definitions of the county where you live and work, details for military personnel, retired individuals, homemakers, unemployed individuals, out-of-state filers, etc. Rounding Required Each line on which an amount can be entered has a “.00” already filled-in. This is to let you know that rounding is now required when completing your tax return. You must round your amounts to the nearest whole dollar. To do this, drop amounts of less than $0.50. Example. $432.49 rounds down to $432.00. Increase amounts of $0.50 or more to the next higher dollar. Example. $432.50 rounds up to $433.00. Losses or Negative Entries When reporting a loss or negative entry, use a negative sign. Example. Write a $125 loss as -125. Full-Year Residents of Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin Commas Do not use commas when entering amounts. For instance, express 1,000 as 1000. If you were a full-year resident of Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin, and your only income from Indiana was from wages, salaries, and/or tips or commissions, then you need to file Form IT-40RNR, Indiana Reciprocal Nonresident Individual Income Tax Return. Enclosing Schedules, W-2s, IN K-1s. Etc. Full-Year Residents You will find an enclosure sequence number in the upper right-hand corner of each schedule. Make sure to put your completed schedules in sequential order behind the IT-40PNR when assembling your tax return. Do not staple or paper clip your enclosures. If you have a schedule on which you’ve made no entry, do not enclose it unless you have completed information on the back of it. Also, enclose: • All W-2s, 1099s, Form IN-MSID-A, and IN K-1s on which Indiana state and/or county tax withholding amounts appear, • Any 1099G showing unemployment compensation, and • A check/money order, if applicable. A note about your W-2s. It is important that your W-2 form is readable. The income and state and county tax amounts withheld are verified on every W-2 form that comes in with your tax return. We encourage you to enclose the best copy available when you file. Who Should File? You may need to file an Indiana income tax return if: • You lived in Indiana and received income, or • You lived outside Indiana and had any income from Indiana. Filing Status Requirement. If you and your spouse file a joint federal return, you must file a joint return with Indiana. If you and your spouse file separate federal returns, you must file separate returns with Indiana. Note. There are three types of tax returns available. The type you need to file is generally based on your residency status. Read the following to decide if you are a full-year resident, part-year resident, or nonresident of Indiana, and which type of return you should file. Part-Year Residents and Full-Year Nonresidents If you were a part-year resident and received income while you lived in Indiana, you must file Indiana Form IT-40PNR, Part-Year Resident or Nonresident Individual Income Tax Return. If you were a legal resident of another state (exception: see next paragraph) and had income from Indiana (except certain interest, dividends, or retirement income), you must file Form IT-40PNR. Full-year residents must file Form IT-40, Indiana Full-Year Resident Individual Income Tax Return. You are a full-year Indiana resident if you maintain your legal residence in Indiana from January 1 – December 31 of the tax year. You do not have to be physically present in Indiana the entire year to be considered a full-year resident. Residents, including military personnel, who leave Indiana for a temporary stay, are considered residents during their absence. Retired persons spending the winter months in another state may still be full-year residents if: • They maintain their legal residence in Indiana and intend to return to Indiana during part of the taxable year, • They retain their Indiana driver’s license, • They retain their Indiana voting rights, and/or • They claim a homestead deduction on their Indiana home for property tax purposes. If you were a full-year resident of Indiana and your gross income (the total of all your income before deductions) was greater than certain exemptions*, you must file Indiana Form IT-40. *To figure your exemptions for filing requirement purposes, Indiana allows a $1,000 exemption for you and a $1,000 exemption for your spouse (if married filing jointly). You also get a $1,000 exemption for each dependent you are eligible to claim. See page 30 for additional information concerning how to figure your dependents. Add the total of these amounts. You are not required to file if this total is greater than your gross income. If your gross income is less than your total exemptions figured above, you are not required to file. However, you may want to file a return to get a refund of any state and/or county tax withheld by your employer, or other refundable credits, such as an earned income credit or estimated tax payment. Deceased Taxpayers If an individual died during 2020, or died after Dec. 31, 2020, but before filing his/her tax return, the executor, administrator or surviving spouse must file a tax return for the individual if: • • • Page 6 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 The deceased was under the age of 65 and had gross income more than $1,000, The deceased was age 65 or older and had gross income more than $2,000, or The deceased was a nonresident and had gross income from Indiana. Be sure to enter the month and day of death for the taxpayer or spouse in the appropriate box located on Schedule H. For example, a date of death of Jan. 9, 2020, would be entered as 01/09/2020. If you are a full-year Indiana resident in the military, your spouse is a legal resident of another state and you filed a joint federal return, you will need to file Form IT-40PNR. Note. The date of death should not be entered here if the individual died after Dec. 31, 2020, but before filing the tax return. The date of death information will be shown on the individual’s 2021 tax return. Important. Refer to the instructions on page 63 for an explanation of county of residence for military personnel. Signing the Deceased Individual’s Tax Return When Should You File? If a joint return is filed by the surviving spouse, the surviving spouse should sign his or her own name and after the signature write: “Filing as Surviving Spouse.” Your tax return is due April 15, 2021. If you file after this date and owe tax, you will owe interest on the unpaid amount and you may owe penalty, too. See page 11 for more information. An executor or administrator appointed to the deceased’s estate must file and sign the return (even if this isn’t the final return), indicating their relationship after their signature (e.g. administrator). Fiscal year tax returns are due by the fifteenth (15) day of the fourth (4th) month after the close of the fiscal year. You must complete the fiscal year filing period information at the top of the form. If there is no executor, or if an administrator has not been appointed, the person filing the return should sign and give their relationship to the deceased (e.g. “John Doe, nephew”). Only one tax return should be filed on behalf of the deceased. Extension of Time to File – What if You Can’t File on Time? Note. The department may ask for a copy of the death certificate, so make sure to keep a copy with your records. Refund Check for a Deceased Individual If you (the surviving spouse, administrator, executor or other) have received a refund check and cannot cash it, contact the State Auditor’s Office at www.in.gov/auditor/924.htm to get a widow’s affidavit (POA30) or a distributee’s affidavit (POA-20). Send the completed affidavit, the refund check and a copy of the death certificate to the State Auditor’s Office so a refund check can be issued to you. Military Personnel – Residency If you were an Indiana resident when you enlisted, you remain an Indiana resident no matter where you are stationed. You must report all your income to Indiana. If you changed your legal residence (military home of record) during the tax year, you are a part-year resident and should file Form IT40PNR. You must also attach a copy of Military Form DD-2058 to the tax return. As an Indiana part-year resident you will be taxed on the income you earned while you were a resident of Indiana, plus any income from Indiana sources. If you are stationed in Indiana and you are a resident of another state, you won’t need to file with Indiana unless you have non-military income from Indiana sources. Example. Annie, who is a Kansas resident, is stationed in Indiana. She earned $1,300 from her Indiana part-time job. She will need to report that income to Indiana on Form IT-40PNR. Page 7 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 You must get an extension of time to file if you: • Are required to file, and • You cannot file your tax return by the April 15, 2021 due date. Whether you owe additional tax, are due a refund, or are breaking even, you still need to get an extension if filing after April 15, 2021. Note. Indiana’s extension of time to file, Form IT-9, extends the filing date to Nov. 14, 2021. If you owe… Option 1. File Indiana’s extension of time to file, Form IT-9, and send in a payment. This must be filed by April 15, 2021, for the extension to be valid. Then, make sure to file your tax return by Nov. 14, 2021, paying any remaining balance due with that filing. While interest is due on any amount paid after April 15, penalty will be waived if both of the following conditions are met: • The remaining balance is paid in full by Nov. 14, 2021, and • You paid at least 90% of the tax expected to be owed by the original April 15 due date. Note. You may file for a state extension of time to file online if you make a payment with it. Access the department’s online payment system at www.in.gov/dor/online-services/dorpay-tax-and-billpayment/ by April 15, and follow the directions for making an extension payment. Option 2. Filing for a federal extension of time to file with the IRS will automatically provide for a state extension of time to file. You must file your state tax return by Nov. 14, 2021, paying any balance due with that filing. While interest is due on any amount paid after the original April 15, 2021 due date, penalty will be waived if both of the following conditions are met: • The remaining balance due is paid in full by Nov. 14, 2021, and • You paid at least 90% of the tax expected to be owed by the original April 15, 2021 due date. If you don’t owe… You’ll need to file for an extension if: • You are due a refund, or • You don’t expect to owe any tax when filing your tax return, and • You are unable to file your return by April 15, 2021. There are two ways to accomplish this: • If you have a federal extension (you filed Form 4868, or made an extension payment via an electronic filing method), you automatically have an extension with Indiana and do not have to file for a separate state extension (Form IT-9). • If you do not have a federal extension, file Form IT-9 by April 15, 2021. Extension Filing Deadline. Both state Form IT-9 and federal Form 4868 extend your state filing time to Nov. 14, 2021. Will You Owe Penalty and/or Interest? Interest is owed on all amounts paid after April 15, 2021. See page 11 for instructions on how to figure interest. Penalty will not be owed if you have: • Paid 90% of the tax you expect to owe by April 15, 2021; • Filed your tax return by Nov. 14, 2021; and • Paid any remaining amount due (including interest) with that filing. Indiana’s Extension of Time to File, Form IT-9 You may get Form IT-9 online at www.in.gov/dor/tax-forms/2020individual-income-tax-forms. You may also file for an extension online (if making a payment) at www.in.gov/dor/online-services/dorpay-tax-and-bill-payment (make sure to do this by April 15, 2021). Nonresidency and Income Taxable to Indiana A part-year resident owes tax on taxable income received from all sources while being a resident of Indiana. A part- or full-year nonresident also owes tax on income from Indiana sources as listed below while a legal resident of another state. Indiana income includes income from the following sources: 1. Winnings from Indiana riverboats, pari-mutuel wagering, and lotteries; 2. Labor or services performed in Indiana, including salaries, wages, tips, commissions, etc.; 3. A farm, business, trade or profession doing business in Indiana; 4. Any personal property located in Indiana; 5. A partnership or an S corporation doing business in Indiana; 6. Stocks, bonds, notes, bank deposits, patents, copyrights, secret processes and formulas, goodwill, trademarks, trade brands, franchises, and other property where earnings are a part of an Indiana business; 7. Trusts and estates given to nonresident heirs; and 8. Pensions and most interest and dividends are taxed by your state of residence when you receive them. Note. If you were a full-year nonresident and your only income from Indiana sources was from pensions, interest and/or dividends (which were not a basic part of the business in Indiana) and/or unemployment compensation, you are not required to file an Indiana income tax return. Reciprocal States: Special Filing and Income Reporting Instructions If you are a resident of Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania or Wisconsin, and: • Where to Report Your Extension Payment. Add your state extension payment to any estimated tax paid. Report the total on Schedule F, line 3. Military personnel on duty outside of the United States and Puerto Rico on the filing due date are allowed an automatic 60 day extension of time to file. A statement must be enclosed with the return verifying that you were outside of the United States or Puerto Rico on April 15, 2021. Military personnel in a presidentially declared combat zone have an automatic extension of 180 days after they leave the combat zone. In addition, if they are hospitalized outside the United States because of such service, the 180-day extension period begins after being released from the hospital. The spouse of such service member must use the same method of filing for both federal and Indiana (e.g. single or joint). When filing the return, write “Combat Zone” across the top of the form (above your Social Security number). Page 8 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 • • You received wages, salaries, tips, or commissions from Indiana, you will not owe Indiana adjusted gross income tax on that income. However, you may owe a county tax. If this is the only type of income you received from Indiana, you should file Form IT-40RNR, reciprocal nonresident Indiana individual income tax return. See the “Need Tax Forms or Information Bulletins?” section on page 3 for options; or You received other types of Indiana-source income besides wages tips, salaries or commissions (see items 1 through 8 above), you must file Form IT-40PNR instead of Form IT-40RNR; or You received both Indiana-source income (see items 1 through 8 above) and wage income from Indiana, you must file form IT-40PNR. The wage income will not be subject to Indiana adjusted gross income tax. However, see the county tax instructions for Reciprocal state residents on page 67 if these wages were earned in an Indiana county. Example. Fred and Deanna are full-year residents of Michigan, and filed a 2020 joint federal income tax return. During 2020 Fred received $10,000 winnings from an Indiana riverboat, and Deanna earned $55,000 wage income from an Elkhart, Indiana employer. Fred’s riverboat winnings will be taxed by Indiana. Enter Fred’s $10,000 winnings on Indiana Schedule A, line 20, Columns A and B. Deanna’s wage income is not subject to Indiana adjusted gross income tax. Therefore, enter Deanna’s wage income in Column A only. Note. See county tax instructions for Reciprocal state residents on page 66 to determine if county tax is due on her wage income. Completing Form IT-40PNR Line 1 – Income Taxed by Indiana Complete Indiana Schedule A: Income or Loss; Proration; and Adjustments to Income. Instructions for Schedule A begin on page 12. Carry the line 36B amount to line 1 on the front of Form IT-40PNR. Make sure to enclose Schedule A when filing. Line 2 – Add-Backs Enter on this line any add-backs from Schedule B: Add-Backs. Instructions for Schedule B begin on page 18. Make sure to enclose Schedule B when filing. Line 4 – Deductions Enter on this line any deductions from Schedule C: Deductions. Instructions for Schedule C begin on page 21. Make sure to enclose Schedule C when filing. Line 6 – Exemptions Enter any exemptions from Schedule D: Exemptions on this line. Instructions for Schedule D begin on page 29. Make sure to enclose Schedule D when filing. Line 9 – County Tax Complete Schedule CT-40PNR to figure your county tax. Instructions for Schedule CT-40PNR begin on page 64. Line 10 – Other Taxes Enter any other taxes from Schedule E: Other Taxes on this line. Instructions for Schedule E begin on page 34. Make sure to enclose Schedule E when filing. Line 12 – Credits Enter your credits from Schedule F: Credits on this line. Instructions for Schedule F begin on page 34. Make sure to enclose Schedule F when filing. Line 13 – Offset Credits Enter any offset credits from Schedule G: Offset Credits on this line. Instructions for Schedule G begin on page 51. Make sure to enclose Schedule G when filing. Page 9 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Line 17 – Donation Check-Offs Enter on this line the total of any donations made on Schedule INDONATE. Make sure to enclose Schedule IN-DONATE, which is located at the bottom of Schedule F: Credits, when filing. See page 50 for more information. Line 19 – Amount to be Applied as a 2021 Estimated Tax Installment Payment You should pay estimated tax if you expect to have income during the 2021 tax year that: • Will not have Indiana income taxes withheld, or • If you think the amount withheld will not be enough to pay your tax liability, and • You expect to owe more than $1,000 when you file your tax return. There are several ways you can make estimated tax payments. First, visit our website at www.in.gov/dor/tax-forms/2020-individualincome-tax-forms to get Form ES-40. Use the worksheet on Form ES40 to see how much you will owe. Then, if you have an overpayment showing on line 18 of your tax return, you can have some or all of the overpayment applied to next year’s estimated tax account. To do so, enter any portion of the overpayment: • On line a, if you want to apply an amount to offset estimated county tax due (from Form ES-40 worksheet, line K). Also, enter the 2-digit county code from line K; and/or • On line b, if your spouse lived in a different county than you did on Jan. 1, 2021, and you want to apply an amount to offset your spouse’s estimated county tax due (from Form ES-40 worksheet, line L). Also, enter the 2-digit county code from line L; and/or • On line c, if you want to apply an amount to offset your estimated state tax due (from Form ES-40 worksheet, line J). Example. Mark and Megan have a $420 overpayment, and want to apply some of it to their 2021 estimated tax account. Their worksheet from Form ES-40 has the following breakdown: • Line I (each installment payment) is $300; • Line J (portion that represents state tax due) is $270; and • Line K (portion that represents county tax due) is $30. They will enter $30 on line 19a (along with their 2-digit county code), $270 on line 19c, and the $300 total amount to be applied will be entered on line 19d. They will get a $120 refund ($420 overpayment minus $300 applied to their 2021 estimated tax account). Example. Stu wants to pay $500 in estimated tax for each installment period. He has a $30 overpayment on his tax return. He chooses to enter the full $30 overpayment on line 19c (Indiana adjusted gross income tax amount), and carries it to line 19d. (He will pay the $470 additional amount by filing the Form ES-40.) Important. Estimated tax installment payments made for the 2021 tax year are due by April 15, 2021, June 15, 2021, Sept. 15, 2021 and Jan. 18, 2022. Any installment payment amount entered on line 19d will be considered to be paid on the day your tax return is filed (postmarked). For instance, an installment payment shown on a return filed on: April 15, 2021, will be considered to be a 2021 first installment payment; June 3, 2021, will be considered to be a 2021 second installment payment; and July 22, 2021, will be considered to be a 2021 third installment payment. Note. You may use Form ES-40 to make a payment by check or money order. Estimated tax payments may also be made online, via credit card or check, at www.in.gov/dor/online-services/dorpay-tax-andbill-payment/. See line 26 instructions on page 12 for details about payment options. See Income Tax Information Bulletin #3 at www.in.gov/dor/files/ reference/ib03.pdf for additional information about estimated taxes. Line 20 – Penalty for Underpayment of Estimated Tax You might owe a penalty for the underpayment of estimated tax if you did not have taxes withheld from your income and/or you did not pay enough estimated tax throughout the year. In fact, not properly paying estimated tax is one of the most common errors made in filing Indiana tax returns. Generally, if you owe $1,000 or more in state and county tax for the year that’s not covered by withholding taxes, you need to be making estimated tax payments. You might owe this penalty if: • The total of your credits, including timely made estimated tax payments, is less than 90% of this year’s tax due or 100%* of last year’s tax due, ** or • You underpaid the minimum amount due for one or more of the installment periods. Example. Jim and Sarah together received $4,500 in pension income each month. Since their income is received on a fairly even basis, they’ll use Schedule IT-2210 to figure their penalty or exception to the penalty. Farmers and fishermen have special filing considerations. If at least two-thirds (2/3) of your gross income is from farming or fishing, complete Schedule IT-2210, using the Section D Short Method. Schedule IT-2210A may be used by individuals who receive income (not subject to withholding tax) unevenly during the year. This schedule will help determine whether a penalty is due, or whether an exception to the penalty has been met. Example. Bill’s income is from selling fireworks in June and July. He will want to figure any penalty due on Schedule IT-2210A, which may exempt him from having had to pay estimated tax on the April 15, 2020, first installment due date. Example. Rachael received a sizeable lump sum distribution in December of 2020. She figured how much estimated tax was due, and paid it by the Jan. 15, 2021, fourth period installment due date. By completing Schedule IT-2210A, she shows she owes no penalty for the first three installment periods, and that a proper payment was made for the fourth installment period. She will owe no penalty. Farmers and Fishermen. Special options are available if more than two-thirds of your gross income for 2019 and/or 2020 was from farming or fishing. If either of these cases apply to you, you must complete either Schedule IT-2210 or IT-2210A to see if you owe a penalty or if you meet an exception. If you owe this penalty, write the penalty amount on Form IT-40PNR, line 20. Keep the completed schedule with your records as the department may request it at a later date. Option 1. Pay your estimated tax in one payment on or before Jan. 15, 2021, and file your tax return by April 15, 2021; or *You must have timely paid 100% of lines 8 and 9 of your 2019 IT-40 or IT-40PNR. Note: If last year’s Indiana adjusted income was more than $150,000 ($75,000 for married filing separately), you must pay 110% of last year’s tax (instead of 100%) to meet this exception. Example. More than two-thirds of Henry’s gross income is from farming. He should complete Schedule IT-2210. He will be able to use the Section D Short Method to figure his penalty or to show he meets an exception to owing a penalty. **Farmers and fishermen should see the special instructions in the next column. Visit our website at www.in.gov/dor/tax-forms/2020-individualincome-tax-forms to get Schedule IT-2210 or IT-2210A. Important. The department will automatically assess an underpayment penalty if it looks like you owe a penalty for the underpayment of estimated tax. Line 21 – Refund Should you Use Schedule IT-2210 or Schedule IT2210A? Important. If the combination of line 19d plus line 20 is greater than the amount on line 18, you must make an adjustment. The estimated tax carryover amount on line 19d is limited; it cannot be greater than the remainder of line 18 minus line 20. See the second example about Stu under the Line 19 instructions on page 9. Schedule IT-2210 should be used by individuals who receive income (not subject to withholding tax) on a fairly even basis throughout the year. This schedule will help determine whether a penalty is due, or whether an exception to the penalty has been met. Page 10 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Option 2. Make no estimated tax payment, and file your tax return and pay all the tax due by March 1, 2021. You have a refund if line 18 is greater than the combined amounts entered on lines 19d and 20. A Note About Refund Offsets Indiana law requires that money you owe to the state, its agencies, and certain federal agencies, be deducted from your refund or credit before a refund is issued. This includes money owed for past-due taxes, student loans, child support, food stamps or an IRS levy. If the department applies your refund to any of these debts, you will receive a letter explaining the situation. When to Expect Your Refund Generally, 10 to 14 business days is the average wait for a refund if the tax return is electronically filed; it can take up to 10 to 12 weeks for the refund to be issued if you mail in your tax return. Where’s Your Refund? There are several ways to check the status of your refund. You will need to know the exact amount of your refund, and a Social Security number entered on your tax return. Then, do one of the following: • Call (317) 233-4018 for automated refund information. • Go to www.in.gov/dor/individual-income-taxes/check-the-statusof-your-refund/ and click Check the Status of Your Refund. • Call (317) 232-2240 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday - Friday, and a representative will help you. A refund directly deposited to your bank account may be listed on your bank statement as a credit, deposit, etc. If you have received information from the department that your refund has been issued, and you are not sure if it has been deposited in your bank account, call the ACH Section of your bank or financial institution for clarification. Important. If we are unable to deposit your refund to the listed account (incorrect/incomplete account numbers; account closed; refund to go to an account outside the United States; etc.), the department will mail a paper check to the address on the front of the tax form. Note. A refund deposited directly to your Hoosier MasterCard account will appear on your monthly statement. Statute of Limitations for Refund Claims There is a statute of limitations when filing for a refund of overpaid taxes for tax year 2020. In general, a claim for refund must be made by April 15, 2024 (Nov. 14, 2024 if filing under extension). The claim for refund is considered to be made on the day your tax return is postmarked. If you file your 2020 tax return after the statute of limitations has expired, no refund will be issued. Line 22 – Direct Deposit You may choose to have your refund deposited in your checking, savings or Hoosier Works Master Card account. If you want your refund directed into your checking or savings account, complete lines 22a, b, c and d. Caution. If you choose this option, make sure to verify the account information after you have entered it. This will help ensure your refund is deposited into your desired account. Page 11 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 The routing number is nine digits, with the first two digits of the number beginning with 01 through 12 or 21 through 32. Do not use a deposit slip to verify the number because it may have internal codes as part of the actual routing number. The account number can be up to 17 digits. Omit any hyphens, accents and special symbols. Enter the number from left to right and leave any unused boxes blank. Check the appropriate box for the type of account you are making your deposit to: either a checking account or savings account. To comply with banking rules, you must place an X in the box on line d if your refund is going to an account outside the United States. If you check the box, we will mail you a paper check. If you currently have a Hoosier Works MasterCard and wish to have your refund directly deposited in your account, enter your 12-digit account number on line 22b, where it says “Account Number” (do not write anything on line 22a “Routing Number”). You can find your 12-digit account number in the upper right-hand corner of your account monthly statement. Note. DO NOT use your MasterCard 16-digit number. Make sure to check the “Hoosier Works MC” box on line 22c. Line 23 If line 21 is less than zero, you have an amount due. Enter here as a positive number and skip to line 24. OR If line 15 is greater than line 14, complete the following steps: Subtract line 14 from line 15 and enter the total here .................................................................................. A___________ Enter any amount from line 20 .................................... B ___________ Add lines A + B. Enter total here and on line 23 ....... C ___________ Line 24 – Penalty You may owe a penalty if your tax return is filed after the April 15, 2021, due date and you have an amount due. Penalty is 10% of the amount due (line 23 minus line 20) or $5, whichever is greater. Exception. No penalty will be due if you have: • An extension of time to file; • Are filing and paying the remaining tax due by the extended filing due date, and • Prepaid at least 90^ of the amount due by April 15, 2021. Line 25 – Interest You will owe interest (even if you have an extension of time to file) if your tax return is filed after the April 15, 2021, due date and you have an amount due. Interest should be figured on the sum of line 23 minus line 20. Contact the department at (317) 232-2240 or visit our website at www.in.gov/dor/files/reference/dn03.pdf to get Departmental Notice #3 for the current interest rate. Line 26 – Amount Due – Payment Options There are several ways to pay the amount you owe. Make your check, money order or cashier’s check payable to Indiana Department of Revenue. Just include the payment loose in the envelope. Do not staple it to the return. Do not send cash. You may also pay using the electronic eCheck payment method. This service uses a paperless check and may be used to pay the tax due with your Indiana individual income tax return, as well as any billings issued by the Indiana Department of Revenue for any tax type. To pay, go to www.in.gov/dor/online-services/dorpay-tax-and-billpayment/ and follow the step-by-step instructions. You will receive a confirmation number and should keep this with your tax filing records. The fee for using this service is $1. Note. All payments made to the Indiana Department of Revenue must be made with U.S. funds. You may also pay by using your MasterCard® or VISA® by logging on to www.in.gov/dor/online-services/dorpay-tax-and-bill-payment/. A convenience fee will be charged by the credit card processor based on the amount you are paying. You will be told what the fee is and you will have the option to either cancel or continue the credit card transaction. Payment plan option. If you cannot pay the full amount due at the time you file, you may be eligible to set up a payment plan online. After you get a tax bill, log on to www.intaxpay.in.gov and select the Individual Eligibility tab. Important. If using the payment plan option, penalty and interest will be due on all amounts paid after the April 15, 2021 due date. Returned Checks and Other Types of Payments If you make a tax payment with a check, credit card, debit card, electronic funds transfer, or any other instrument in payment by any commercially allowable means, and the department is unable to obtain payment for its full amount when it is presented for payment through normal banking channels, a $35 penalty will be assessed. The assessed amount will be due immediately upon receipt of the tax due notice and must be paid by certified check, bank draft or money order. Note. Any permits and/or licenses issued by the department may be revoked if the assessed amount is not paid immediately. Signatures and Signing Dates First, read the Authorization area on Schedule H. Then, sign and date the tax return. If this is a jointly filed tax return, both you and your spouse must sign and date it. Make sure to enclose the completed Schedule H when filing. Page 12 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Taxpayer Advocate As prescribed by the Taxpayer Bill of Rights, the department has an appointed Taxpayer Advocate whose purpose is to facilitate the resolution of taxpayer complaints and complex tax issues. If you have a complex tax issue, you must first pursue resolution through normal channels, such as contacting the customer service division (317-232-2240). If you are still unable to resolve your tax issue, or a tax assessment places an undue hardship on you, you may receive assistance from the Office of the Taxpayer Advocate. For more information, and to get required schedules if filing for an offer in compromise or a hardship case, visit our website at www.in.gov/dor/contact-us/taxpayer-advocate-office/. You may also contact the Office of the Taxpayer Advocate directly at [email protected], or by telephone at (317) 2324692. Submit supporting information and documents to Indiana Department of Revenue, Office of the Taxpayer Advocate, P.O. Box 6155, Indianapolis, Ind. 46206-6155. Where to Mail Your Tax Return If you are enclosing a payment, please mail your tax return with all enclosures to: Indiana Department of Revenue P.O. Box 7224 Indianapolis, IN 46207-7224 For all other filings, please mail your tax return with all enclosures to: Indiana Department of Revenue P.O. Box 40 Indianapolis, IN 46206-0040 Schedule A Sections 1, 2 and 3 Instructions Sections 1, 2 and 3 will help you to separate the income to be taxed and adjustments to be allowed by Indiana. General Information Income received from Indiana sources should be reported as Indiana income by nonresidents, except certain types of Indiana-source income that are subject to tax only by your state of residence at the time you receive it. For part-year residents, the portion of the following types of income from Indiana sources that were received while a nonresident should not be reported as income taxed by Indiana: interest, dividends, unemployment compensation, royalties and gains from the sale of capital assets, unless such income results from the conduct of a trade or business. For example, dividends received from an S corporation doing business in Indiana should be reported by nonresidents as income taxable in Indiana. For full-year nonresidents, the portion of the following types of income from Indiana sources should not be reported as income taxed by Indiana: interest, dividends, unemployment compensation, royalties and gains from the sale of capital assets, unless such income results from the conduct of trade or business. Example. Dividends received from an S corporation doing business in Indiana must be reported by nonresidents as income taxable in Indiana. Example. Interest income received by an Illinois resident from an Indiana personal savings account is not income taxable to Indiana. Read the following line-by-line instructions for more information. Also, see Income Tax Information Bulletin #28 at www.in.gov/dor/files/reference/ib28.pdf for more information. Lines 3 and 4 – Interest and Dividend Income Enter in Column A your taxable interest and dividend income as reported on your federal return, lines 2b and/or 3b, and report the interest and dividend income attributable to Indiana in Column B. If any of the interest reported in Column B is from U.S. government obligations, including U.S. savings bonds, Treasury notes, T-Bills, etc., you may deduct these amounts on Form IT-40PNR, Schedule C, line 4. Interest from municipal obligations. Do not report any interest from municipal obligations on line 3. However, if you were an Indiana resident when receiving interest from a non-Indiana municipal obligation, see OOS municipal obligation interest add-back on page 18 to see if you are required to add it to your Indiana income to be taxed. See Income Tax Information Bulletin #19 at www.in.gov/dor/files/ reference/ib19.pdf for more information. Important Information about Possible Year-End Federal Legislation Line 5 – Taxable Refunds, Credits or Offsets You may wish to periodically check the department’s homepage at www.in.gov/dor for updates about any impact of late federal legislation. Line 6 – Alimony Received This publication was finalized before all year-end federal legislative changes were complete. Therefore, some of the income/loss and adjustments reported may need to be adjusted. How to Report a Loss When reporting a loss or negative entry, use a negative sign. Example. Write a $125 loss as -125. Schedule A Section 1: Income or Loss You must complete your federal income tax return first. Unless otherwise stated: • Enter in Column A your income and adjustments as they appear on your federal return, Form 1040/1040-SR; and • Enter in Column B the portion of your income and adjustments that is subject to Indiana income tax. Lines 1 and 2 – Wages, Salaries, Tips, Etc. Enter wages, salaries, tips and/or other compensation received as an employee. You should report your income on line 1 and your spouse’s income on line 2. Enter in Column B income received while you were an Indiana resident, and/or income from Indiana sources received while you were not an Indiana resident. Note for part-year or full-year nonresidents. Do not enter that portion of your Indiana source wage, salary, tip or commission income in Column B earned while you were a resident of a reciprocal agreement state (see Reciprocal States: Special Filing and Income Reporting Instructions on page 8). Page 13 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Enter in Column A the amount of taxable refunds, credits or offsets of state and local income taxes that was reported on your federal Schedule 1, line 1. Enter in Column B that portion received while you were an Indiana resident. Enter in Column A the amount of alimony reported on your federal Schedule 1, line 2a. Enter in Column B that portion you received while you were an Indiana resident. Lines 7, 12 – 16 Important. The amounts on line 7 and lines 12 through 16 should reflect the amounts reported on your federal Schedule 1 (after any application of passive activity loss limitations from federal Form 8582). Line 7 – Business Income or Loss Enter in Column A the business income from Schedules C that is reported on federal Schedule 1, line 3. Enter in Column B that portion of business income subject to tax in Indiana. Also, see the instructions for: • Tax Add-Back on Schedule B, line 1, on page 18, • Apportionment on line 19 if this income is from a business doing business both within and outside Indiana, and • Other Income on line 20. Line 8 – Capital Gain or Loss from Sale or Exchange of Property Enter in Column A the capital gain or loss from federal Schedule D that is reported on federal Form 1040/1040-SR, line 7. Enter in Column B that portion received while you were an Indiana resident and/or or from the sale or exchange of property located in Indiana. Note. Any capital loss claimed is subject to the same capital loss limitations that apply for federal tax purposes. For more information about federal capital loss limitations, get federal Schedule D, Capital Gains and Losses. Schedule A: Section 1: Income or Loss continued Example. Jessica had a $4,000 long term capital loss while living in Indiana from Jan. 1, 2020, through Sep. 30, 2020. She moved to Utah on Oct. 1, and lived there the rest of the year. She realized a $5,000 long term capital gain while she was a resident of Utah. She reported $1,000 capital gain income on her federal Schedule 1. She will report a $3,000 loss to Indiana. The remaining $1,000 loss will be available to offset income on Indiana tax return(s) for other years. Line 9 – Other Gains or Losses from Form 4797 Enter the gain or loss from the sale or exchange of property as reported for federal tax purposes on federal Schedule 1, line 4. Enter in Column B that portion received: • If the property was Indiana property, and/or • While you were an Indiana resident, regardless of the source. Line 10 – IRA Distributions Enter in Column A the taxable portion of the IRA distribution reported on your federal Form 1040/1040-SR, line 4b. Enter in Column B that portion received while you were an Indiana resident. Line 11 – Pensions and Annuities Enter in Column A the taxable portion of all pensions, annuities and other retirement income as reported on your federal Form 1040/1040SR, line 5b. Enter in Column B that portion received while you were an Indiana resident. Note. You will be eligible for a deduction if you included any railroad retirement benefits issued by the U.S. Railroad Retirement Board on this line in Column B. See Schedule C, line 6 instructions for more information. Lines 13, 14 and 15 – Partnership, Trust and Estates, and S Corporation Income or Loss Enter in Column A the income or loss from partnerships, trusts and estates, and S corporations, that is included in the total on federal Schedule 1, line 5. Enter in Column B that portion of income received from the partnerships, trusts and estates, and S corporations while you were an Indiana resident and/or the portion received from Indiana sources while being a nonresident. Fiduciary*. If you are a nonresident, the Indiana fiduciary(s) should provide to you an apportioned amount to be taxed by Indiana on Schedule IN K-1. If the fiduciary does not apportion its income, then enter in Column B the same amount as you entered in Column A. Partnership and S Corporation*. If you are a nonresident, the Indiana partnership/S corporation should provide to you an apportioned amount to be taxed by Indiana on Schedule IN K-1. If that Indiana entity does not apportion the income, then enter in Column B the same amount from that entity(s) as you entered in Column A. *Information for Nonresidents. Partnerships, S corporations, and trusts and estates located in and/or doing business in Indiana are required to: • File an annual return, Form IT-65/Form IT-20S/Form IT-41; • Withhold Indiana state and county (when applicable) income tax on behalf of their nonresident partners/shareholders/ beneficiaries*; and, • Figure and pay (with the filing of that annual return and Schedule Composite) Indiana state and county income tax due on their individual nonresident partners/shareholders/beneficiaries.* Line 12 – Net Rent or Royalty Income or Loss *This withholding requirement does not apply to the residents of Arizona, Oregon, and Washington D.C., who are subject to and pay income taxes at rates of 3.23% (.0323) or higher to their resident state. Enter in Column B the net royalty income/loss: • Received while you were an Indiana resident; and • Received while you were an Indiana nonresident if the income/ loss results from the conduct of a trade or business conducted in Indiana. Individuals who are included on the entities Schedule Composite are not required to file an individual income tax return to report income from those entities with two exceptions: Enter in Column A the net rent and royalty income or loss included in the total on federal Schedule 1, line 5. Enter in Column B the net rental income/loss: • Received while you were an Indiana resident; or • From real property located in Indiana received while you were a nonresident; and • In general, from personal property located in Indiana. Also, see the instructions for tax add-back for Section B, line 1, on page 18. Page 14 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Exception 1. Form IT-40PNR must be filed and all taxable income reported if the pass-through entity withholds county tax on the nonresident partner, shareholder and/or beneficiary. See Form IT-65/ IT-20S Schedule IN K-1, line 9, or Form IT-41 Schedule IN K-1, line 12. Exception 2. Form IT-40PNR must be filed and all taxable income reported if the individual has other taxable Indiana-source income that is not included on a Schedule Composite. However, if you have any other Indiana-source income, you are required to file Form IT-40PNR, reporting both that income and any income already reported and taxed on Form IT-65/IT-20S (all Indiana-source income). Schedule A: Section 1: Income or Loss continued You will need to include Schedule IN K-1 with the filing for the Indiana income tax return, and report any withholding amounts from that schedule on Indiana’s Schedule F, lines 1 and 2. Note. See the instructions for tax add-back for Schedule B, line 1, on page 18. Line 16 – Farm Income or Loss Enter in Column A the farm income/loss from federal Schedule 1, line 6. Enter in Column B that portion of farm income/loss subject to tax in Indiana. Also, see the instructions for: • Apportionment on Section 1, line 6 if this income is from a farm doing business both within and outside Indiana, and • Tax add-back for Schedule B, line 1, on page 18. Line 17 – Unemployment Compensation Enter in Column A the unemployment income from federal Schedule 1, line 7. Enter in Column B that portion of unemployment income received while you were an Indiana resident. Important. You may qualify for a deduction if you received unemployment compensation while you were an Indiana resident. For more information, see page 23 for Schedule C, line 10 instructions. Line 18 – Social Security and Railroad Retirement Benefits Enter in Column A the portion of Social Security and/or railroad retirement benefits that are taxed on your federal Form 1040/1040-SR, line 5b and/or line 6b. Enter in Column B* the portion received while you were an Indiana resident. *Note. Indiana will not tax Social Security benefits or railroad retirement benefits which are issued by the U.S. Railroad Retirement Board. Therefore, if you listed any of these benefits in Column B. then look at Indiana Schedule C: Deductions. Enter those same amounts on line 5 and/or line 6 on Schedule C. Line 19 – Indiana Apportioned Income Apportioned business income from Schedule IT-40PNRA is reported on this line. The apportionment schedule is used only by nonresidents with income or losses from a business that does business both within and outside Indiana. Report the amount from Schedule(s) IT40PNRA, Part 3, line 3. You may access Schedule IT-40PNRA at www. in.gov/dor/tax-forms/2020-individual-income-tax-forms. Note. If you are apportioning business income, make sure to: • Report the full amount from your federal return onto Indiana Schedule A, Section 1, Column A, and • Not report any of that income in the corresponding Column B. Instead, you will report the amount to be taxed by Indiana in Column B on this line. Page 15 IT-40PNR Booklet 2020 Example. Mark is a full-year nonresident of Indiana. His company did business both within Indiana and in other states. On Indiana Schedule A, Section 1, line 7, Column A, he reported the same amount of business income as he reported on his federal Schedule 1. He left line 7, Column B blank. He entered the amount apportioned to Indiana on Section 1, line 19, Column B. Line 20 – Other Income Enter any other income or loss for which there is no named line provided on the IT-40PNR return. • Report any NOL from your federal Schedule 1, line 8, as a negative amount in Column A only. You will show the Indiana portion of your Indiana net operating loss deduction on Schedule C under line 11. See instructions for Indiana net operating loss deduction on page 23 for more information. • Other types of income or loss would include riverboat winnings, prizes, awards, amounts recovered from bad debts, gross lottery and other gambling winnings, etc., as reported on your federal return. List the source(s) of the income or loss reported on this line. Schedule A Proration The purpose of this section is to compare the Indiana Schedule A, Section 1, line 21A income taxed on your federal return to the line 21B income taxed by Indiana. To do this, divide the amount on line 21B by the amount on line 21A. Please round your answer to a decimal followed by three numbers. Example. $3,100 ÷ $8,000 = .3875, which rounds to .388. Enter the result here and on Schedule D: Exemptions, line 6. Note. If line 21B is a loss, enter zero (0) in Box 21D and on Schedule D: Exemptions, line 6. If line 21A (or Box 21C) is a loss, and line 21B is a positive amount, enter 1.00 (100%) in Box 21D and on Schedule D: Exemptions, line 6. Special instructions for non-Indiana military personnel. If you are in the military and Indiana is not your home of record, your military income will not be used to reduce your Indiana exemptions. Complete the worksheet on the following page. Step 1 Enter the amount from Schedule A, line 21A........................................................................ 1 _____________ Step 2 Enter any non-Indiana service member’s military income included on Schedule A, lines 1A and/or 2A............................... 2 _____________ Step 3 Subtract Step 2 from Step 1. Enter result here and in Box 21C on Schedule A, Proration Section ................................. 3 _____________ Step 4 Enter the amount from Schedule A, line 21B ....................................................................... 4 _____________ Step 5 Divide Step 4 by Step 3. Round the result to a decimal followed by three numbers. Enter result here and in Box 21D of the Proration Section on Schedule A.................. 5 _____________ Schedule A Section 2: Adjustments to Income Adjustments to income from federal Form 1040/1040-SR and fed
Extracted from PDF file 2020-indiana-it-40pnr-booklet.pdf, last modified January 2021

More about the Indiana IT-40PNR Booklet Individual Income Tax Nonresident TY 2020

This IT-40PNR Income Tax Instruction Booklet does not include tax forms or schedules. IT-40PNR Booklet requires you to list multiple forms of income, such as wages, interest, or alimony .

We last updated the Part-Year and Full-Year Nonresident Income Tax Instruction Booklet in January 2021, so this is the latest version of IT-40PNR Booklet, fully updated for tax year 2020. You can download or print current or past-year PDFs of IT-40PNR Booklet directly from TaxFormFinder. You can print other Indiana tax forms here.

Related Indiana Individual Income Tax Forms:

TaxFormFinder has an additional 69 Indiana income tax forms that you may need, plus all federal income tax forms. These related forms may also be needed with the Indiana IT-40PNR Booklet.

Form Code Form Name
IT-40PNR Form Part-Year or Full-Year Nonresident Individual Income Tax Return
Form IT-40PNRA Indiana Apportionment Schedule for Nonresident Individuals

Download all IN tax forms View all 70 Indiana Income Tax Forms


Form Sources:

Indiana usually releases forms for the current tax year between January and April. We last updated Indiana IT-40PNR Booklet from the Department of Revenue in January 2021.

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IT-40PNR Booklet is an Indiana Individual Income Tax form. Many states have separate versions of their tax returns for nonresidents or part-year residents - that is, people who earn taxable income in that state live in a different state, or who live in the state for only a portion of the year. These nonresident returns allow taxpayers to specify which which income is subject to the state's taxes, and which is not.

About the Individual Income Tax

The IRS and most states collect a personal income tax, which is paid throughout the year via tax withholding or estimated income tax payments.

Most taxpayers are required to file a yearly income tax return in April to both the Internal Revenue Service and their state's revenue department, which will result in either a tax refund of excess withheld income or a tax payment if the withholding does not cover the taxpayer's entire liability. Every taxpayer's situation is different - please consult a CPA or licensed tax preparer to ensure that you are filing the correct tax forms!

Historical Past-Year Versions of Indiana IT-40PNR Booklet

We have a total of ten past-year versions of IT-40PNR Booklet in the TaxFormFinder archives, including for the previous tax year. Download past year versions of this tax form as PDFs here:



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