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Hawaii Free Printable Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2020 for 2021 Hawaii Hawaii Income Tax Instruction Booklet

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Hawaii Income Tax Instruction Booklet
Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2020

Clear Form 2020 N-11 STATE OF HAWAII — DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION Hawaii Resident Income Tax Instructions Caution: Part-Year Residents Must Use Form N-15 E-file Form N-11! E-file Form N-11 through Hawaii Tax Online, the Department’s website. For more information, go to hitax.hawaii.gov or E-file Form N-11 and federal Form 1040 using approved tax preparation software or authorized tax professionals. For more information, go to tax.hawaii.gov For more information, see page 26 of the Instructions. DUE DATE: APRIL 20, 2021 MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR I. Department of Taxation Welcomes your Feedback At the Department of Taxation, we are committed to our mission to administer the tax laws of the State of Hawaii in a consistent, uniform, and fair manner. To help us with this commitment, we welcome your feedback to assist our effort to improve our services and make voluntary compliance as easy as possible. Please address your written suggestions to the Department of Taxation, P.O. Box 259, Honolulu, HI, 96809-0259, or email them to [email protected] II. Electronic Filing and Paying Advances Are Being Made Each year, thousands of individuals file and pay their taxes electronically. You can e-file yourself or through your tax practitioner using commercially available software. For up to date information, visit our website at tax.hawaii.gov. III. We are Here to Assist You Form N-11, Individual Income Tax Return (Resident Form), is due on or before April 20, 2021. For information and guidance in its preparation, we have helpful publications and other instructions on our website at tax.hawaii.gov. Need more assistance? Do not hesitate to telephone, write, or visit any of our six offices below: Oahu Maui Molokai Hawaii Kona Kauai 830 Punchbowl Street, Honolulu, HI 96813-5094 54 S. High Street, #208, Wailuku, HI 96793-2198 35 Ala Malama Street, #101, Kaunakakai, HI 96748 75 Aupuni Street, #101, Hilo, HI 96720-4245 82-6130 Mamalahoa Hwy, #8, Captain Cook, HI 96704 3060 Eiwa Street, #105, Lihue, HI 96766-1889 Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: 808-587-4242 808-984-8500 808-553-5541 808-974-6321 808-323-4597 808-274-3456 To better assist you, always keep a copy of your return, worksheets, and supporting documents in your possession; we can help you understand and resolve problems more quickly if you have your tax return information in front of you. Keeping a copy will also help you in preparing the following year’s tax return. Thank you for helping us provide more efficient service. ISAAC W. CHOY Director of Taxation State of Hawaii Department of Taxation P.O. Box 3559 Honolulu, Hawaii 96811-3559 Make your check payable to the “Hawaii State Tax Collector” PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Honolulu, Hawaii Permit No. 481 Changes to Note • • • • • • • • • Hawaii adopted the following provisions of the CARES Act: (1) Exclusion from gross income of loans forgiven under the Paycheck Protection Program, (2) Increases to non-taxable loans from retirement plans, (3) Increases to certain charitable contributions limits, and (4) Exclusion from gross income of the amounts received as “recovery rebates” under the CARES Act (the stimulus payments). (Act 13, SLH 2020) Hawaii adopted the federal provision that allows a reduction in taxable income for taxpayers who do not itemize their deductions on their federal return. The adjustment reduces the federal AGI by up to $300 for qualified cash gifts to public charities. (Act 13, SLH 2020) All taxpayers are subject to the 7.5% threshold for the itemized deductions for medical expenses, effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2018 and before January 1, 2021. (Act 13, SLH 2020) The Renewable Energy Technologies Income Tax Credit (RETITC) is amended by repealing the RETITC for commercial projects with a total output capacity of 5 megawatts or greater for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2019 and provides grandfathering exceptions for commercial solar projects with a: (1) Total output capacity of 5 megawatts or greater if the project received a Public Utilities Commission (PUC) approval prior to December 31, 2019; and (2) Pumped hydroelectric energy storage system provided that the applicable project approval filings have been made to the PUC by December 31, 2021. (Act 61, SLH 2020) Form N-1, Declaration of Estimated Income Tax for Individuals, and Form N-101A, Individual Income Tax Extension Payment Voucher, are obsolete. Use Form N-200V, Individual Income Tax Payment Voucher, to make estimated tax and extension payments. Taxpayers may exclude up to $6,943 of their military reserve or Hawaii National Guard duty pay from their income, effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2019. (Act 197, SLH 2004) The Tax Credit for Research Activities is amended by extending the credit through 2024, allowing the credit to be claimed for all qualified research expenses incurred in Hawaii without regard to the amount of expenses for previous years (base amount), and imposing an annual cap of $5,000,000, effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2019. (Act 261, SLH 2019) The Historic Preservation Income Tax Credit is a new nonrefundable credit for taxable years 2020 to 2024 for substantial rehabilitation of a certified historic structure. (Act 267, SLH 2019) The Ship Repair Industry Tax Credit is a new nonrefundable credit for taxable years 2022 to 2026 for the construction of a new drydock at Pearl Harbor for use by the United States Navy. (Act 260, SLH 2019) Important Reminders File and Pay on Time • Please file your return and pay your taxes by April 20, 2021. • When you mail your return: (1) Mail it to the appropriate address as stated in “Where to File.” (2) Enclose only one return per envelope. (3) Use proper postage. If there is insufficient postage on the envelope, the U.S. Postal Service will return it to you. • Keep a copy of your return for your records. Extension of Time to File • If you are unable to file by April 20, 2021, you are granted an automatic 6-month extension of time to file your return through October 20, 2021. You do not have to file a form to request an extension. The extension of time to file is not an extension of time for payment of tax. (1) If you are due a refund, just file your return by October 20, 2021. (2) If you have a balance due, you must pay your taxes in full by April 20, 2021. File Form N-200V with your payment. You may not use federal Form 4868 instead of Form N-200V. (3) If you’re not sure if you have a balance due, use the worksheet in “When to File.” Make Sure Your Tax Return is Correct and Complete • You can avoid processing delays, adjustments to your return, and additional correspondence from the Department of Taxation if you: (1) Make sure all social security numbers are correct. (2) Check the appropriate filing status box. (3) Complete all required entries on your return. The following lines must be filled in: Form N-11, line 24; and Form N-15, line 41. (4) Check the arithmetic on your return. (5) Attach all required forms and statements. (6) Attach your employee earning statements (HW-2s or federal W-2s) to the front of your return. (7) Sign your return. If you paid someone to prepare your return, the preparer must sign and complete the Paid Preparer’s Information box. • You may be required to file an amended return to complete missing entries or provide missing forms or statements. Amended Returns • If you are filing an amended return, you must submit a complete return and attach Schedule AMD along with all required forms and statements. If you are claiming any tax credits, remember to attach the required forms, such as Schedule CR and Schedule X, even if you claimed the credits on the original return. See “Make Sure Your Tax Return is Correct and Complete” above. Married Taxpayers • If you are married, print your spouse’s social security number in the designated area on your return whether a joint or separate return is filed. • If your spouse is an alien and was issued an ITIN by the IRS, enter your spouse’s ITIN. If your spouse has applied for an ITIN but the IRS has not yet issued the ITIN, write “Applied For.” • If you are married and filing separate returns, the refund from your spouse’s return cannot be applied to your liability. Page 2 STATE OF HAWAII — DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION RELATED FEDERAL/HAWAII TAX FORMS Copy of Fed. Form Federal Comparable May Be Form Number Title or Description of Federal Form Hawaii Form Submitted+ W-2 ......................Wage and Tax Statement ...................................................................................................................... HW-2.................... Yes W-4 ......................Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate ...................................................................................... HW-4.................... No W-10 ....................Dependent Care Provider’s Identification and Certification ................................................................... HW-16.................. No 461.......................Limitation on Business Losses .............................................................................................................. None .................... Yes 1040.....................U.S. Individual Income Tax Return......................................................................................................... None .................... No 1040-SR ..............U.S. Tax Return for Seniors ................................................................................................................... None .................... No 1040 Sch A ..........Itemized Deductions .............................................................................................................................. None .................... No Sch B ...................Interest and Ordinary Dividends ............................................................................................................ None .................... No Sch C ...................Profit or Loss From Business ................................................................................................................ None .................... Not Required Sch C-EZ .............Net Profit From Business....................................................................................................................... None .................... Not Required Sch D ...................Capital Gains and Losses ..................................................................................................................... None .................... No Sch E ...................Supplemental Income and Loss ............................................................................................................ None .................... Not Required Sch F ...................Profit or Loss From Farming .................................................................................................................. None .................... Not Required Sch J....................Income Averaging for Farmers and Fishermen ..................................................................................... N-168 ................... No Sch R ...................Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled..................................................................................................... None .................... No 1040-ES...............Estimated Tax for Individuals ................................................................................................................. None .................... No 1040NR ...............U.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return ........................................................................................... None .................... No 1040-V .................Payment Voucher................................................................................................................................... N-200V................. No 1040X ..................Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return ........................................................................................ None .................... No 1045.....................Application for Tentative Refund ............................................................................................................ N-109 ................... No 1128.....................Application To Adopt, Change, or Retain a Tax Year.............................................................................. None .................... Yes 1310.....................Statement of Person Claiming Refund Due a Deceased Taxpayer ....................................................... N-110 ................... No 2106.....................Employee Business Expenses .............................................................................................................. None .................... Yes* 2106-EZ ...............Unreimbursed Employee Business Expenses ....................................................................................... None .................... Yes* 2120.....................Multiple Support Declaration ................................................................................................................. None .................... Yes 2210.....................Underpayment of Estimated Tax by Individuals, Estates, and Trusts .................................................... N-210 ................... No 2441.....................Child and Dependent Care Expenses ................................................................................................... Sch X ................... No 2848.....................Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative ........................................................................... N-848 ................... No 3115.....................Application for Change in Accounting Method....................................................................................... None .................... Yes 3903.....................Moving Expenses .................................................................................................................................. N-139 ................... No 4562.....................Depreciation and Amortization .............................................................................................................. None .................... Yes 4684.....................Casualties and Thefts ............................................................................................................................ None .................... Yes* 4797.....................Sales of Business Property ................................................................................................................... Sch D-1 ................ No 4835.....................Farm Rental Income and Expenses ...................................................................................................... None .................... Yes 4852.....................Substitute for Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, or Form 1099-R, Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement or Profit-Sharing Plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, etc. ............ L-15 ..................... No 4868.....................Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return ....................... None .................... No 4952.....................Investment Interest Expense Deduction ................................................................................................ N-158 ................... No 4970.....................Tax on Accumulation Distribution of Trusts ............................................................................................ N-405 ................... No 4972.....................Tax on Lump-Sum Distributions ............................................................................................................ N-152 ................... No 5213.....................Election To Postpone Determination as To Whether the Presumption Applies That an Activity Is Engaged in for Profit ....................................................................................................... None .................... Yes 5329.....................Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRAs) and Other Tax-Favored Accounts....................... None .................... No 5884.....................Work Opportunity Credit ........................................................................................................................ N-884 ................... No 6198.....................At-Risk Limitations................................................................................................................................. None .................... Yes 6252.....................Installment Sale Income ........................................................................................................................ None .................... Yes 6781.....................Gains and Losses From Section 1256 Contracts and Straddles ........................................................... None .................... Yes 8283.....................Noncash Charitable Contributions ......................................................................................................... None .................... Yes 8332.....................Release/Revocation of Release of Claim to Exemption for Child by Custodial Parent .......................... None .................... Yes 8582.....................Passive Activity Loss Limitations ........................................................................................................... None .................... Yes 8586.....................Low-Income Housing Credit .................................................................................................................. N-586 ................... No 8615.....................Tax for Certain Children Who Have Unearned Income ......................................................................... N-615 ................... No 8814.....................Parents’ Election To Report Child’s Interest and Dividends ................................................................... N-814 ................... No 8824.....................Like-Kind Exchanges ............................................................................................................................. None .................... Yes 8829.....................Expenses for Business Use of Your Home ............................................................................................ None .................... Yes 8853.....................Archer MSAs and Long-Term Care Insurance Contracts ...................................................................... None .................... No 8949.....................Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets .................................................................................... None .................... Yes +If “Yes” is indicated and there is no Hawaii equivalent form, the federal form must be used. *Use the 2017 federal form when filing the 2020 Form N-11 or Form N-15. You may obtain tax forms through the Department of Taxation’s website at tax.hawaii.gov. To request tax forms by mail, you may call 808-587-4242 or toll-free 1-800-222-3229. Page 3 Form N-11 — General Instructions Guidelines for Filling in Scannable Forms Form N-11 and Schedule CR are designed for electronic scanning that permits faster processing with fewer errors. To avoid delays: • Print amounts only on those lines that are applicable. • Use only a black or dark blue ink pen. Do not use red ink, pencils, felt tip pens, or erasable pens. • Because this form is read by a machine, print your numbers inside the boxes like this: 1234567890x • Do NOT print outside the boxes. • Fill in ovals completely. Do not  or  the ovals. • Do NOT enter cents. For numbers that are required to be rounded to the nearest dollar, do NOT print over the zeros printed on the form that are used to designate cents. • Do NOT use dollar signs, slashes, dashes, or parentheses in the boxes. • Do NOT photocopy this form. • Please use a color printer and print in color. Same-Sex Marriage Effective December 2, 2013, Hawaii recognizes marriages between individuals of the same sex. As it relates to taxation, all samesex couples that are legally married in Hawaii or any other jurisdiction where such marriages are valid are married for all tax purposes, including Hawaii income tax purposes. Note: The federal government recognizes marriages between individuals of the same sex for federal income tax purposes. Civil Unions Effective January 1, 2012, civil unions are recognized in Hawaii. Civil unions entered into in a jurisdiction other than Hawaii are also recognized, provided that the relationship meets Hawaii’s eligibility requirements, has been entered into in accordance with the laws of the other jurisdiction, and can be documented. The Internal Revenue Code (IRC) provisions referred to in Hawaii’s Income Tax Law that apply to a husband and wife, spouses, or person in a legal marital relationship shall be deemed to apply to partners in a civil union with the same force and effect as if they were “husband and wife,” “spouses,” or other terms that describe persons in a legal marital relationship. Accordingly, references to “married” and “spouse” are also references to “in a civil union” and “civil union partner,” respectively. Page 4 For Hawaii income tax purposes, civil union couples have the same tax filing status options as married couples. Also, if an employee benefit is tax-exempt when extended to the opposite sex spouse of an employee, or to the children of the spouse, the benefit is tax-exempt when extended to a civil union partner of an employee, or to the children of the civil union partner. Note: Individuals who have entered into a registered domestic partnership, civil union, or other similar relationship that is not considered a marriage under state (or foreign) law are not considered married for federal income tax purposes. Since the federal government does not recognize civil unions as married individuals for federal income tax purposes, civil unions will continue to file as unmarried individuals on their federal income tax returns. Also, the income reported for federal and for Hawaii income tax purposes may differ, depending on the situation. For example, certain employee benefits that are tax-exempt when provided to married couples and the children of married couples may be taxable federally when they are provided for civil union partners and their children, unless the civil union partner or their children qualify as dependents under IRC section 152. Who Must File 1. Every individual doing business in Hawaii during the taxable year must file a return, whether or not the individual derives any taxable income from that business. “Doing business” includes all activities engaged in or caused to be engaged in with the object of gain or economic benefit, direct or indirect, except personal services performed as an employee under the direction and control of an employer. For example, every person receiving rents from property owned in Hawaii is “doing business” and must file a return whether or not the person’s expenses exceed the gross rental income. 2. Every individual receiving more than the following amounts of gross income subject to taxation under Hawaii Income Tax Law, including amounts received as salaries and wages for services rendered by an employee to an employer, must file a return: For Individuals Under Age 65 Filing Status Gross Income of Married filing separately $3,344 Single $3,344 Head of household $4,356 Qualifying widow(er) $5,544 Married filing jointly $6,688 For Individuals Age 65 or older Filing Status Gross Income of Married filing separately $4,488 Single $4,488 Head of household $5,500 Qualifying widow(er) $6,688 Married filing jointly, one is 65 or older $7,832 Married filing jointly, both are 65 or older $8,976 These threshold amounts will be higher for persons who are blind, deaf, or totally disabled, and who have completed and filed a certification with the Department of Taxation (Department) of their disability on Form N-172 before filing their income tax return. For individuals who can be claimed as dependents on the tax return of another taxpayer, the threshold amount is the amount of the dependents’ standard deduction. For nonresident aliens, the threshold amount is $1,144 for individuals under 65, and $2,288 for individuals 65 or older. For nonresident individuals, the threshold amounts stated above must be multiplied by the ratio of Hawaii adjusted gross income to total adjusted gross income from all sources to determine whether the individual must file a return. 3. Children who receive unearned income during the taxable year and have not attained the age of 14 years before the end of the taxable year must file their own returns to report their income unless their parent or parents report that income. However, the Department will, administratively, not require the filing of a State income tax return if the child’s total earned and/or unearned income for the taxable year is $500 or less and the application of the standard deduction amount results in no taxable income for the child. Children who must file a return may need to file Form N-615, Computation of Tax for Children Under Age 14 Who Have Unearned Income of More than $1,000. Parents may report income of their children by filing Form N-814, Parent’s Election to Report Child’s Interest and Dividends. 4. If you need to report additional tax from Form N-2, Distribution from an Individual Housing Account; Form N-103, Sale of Your Home; Form N-152, Tax on Lump-Sum Distributions; Form N-312, Recapture of Capital Goods Excise Tax Credit; Form N-338, Recapture of Tax Credit for Flood Victims; Form N-344, Recapture of Important Agricultural Land Qualified Agricultural Cost Tax Credit; Form N-348, Recapture of Capital Infrastructure Tax Credit; Form N-405, Tax on Accumulation Distribution of Trusts; Form N-586, Recapture of Tax Credit for Low-Income Hous- ing; or Form N-814, Parent’s Election to Report Child’s Interest and Dividends, then you must file a return regardless of income level. income from all sources during the period of residency, and on income from Hawaii sources only during the period of nonresidency. Who Should File Domicile Defined Even if you do not have to file, you should file to get a refund if too much income tax was withheld from your pay. Also, if you are eligible for refundable credits, you need to file a return to claim the credits. Residency Status Resident A resident is taxed on income from all sources. A resident must file an Individual Income Tax Return—Resident (Form N-11), if required to do so. A Hawaii resident is (1) Every individual domiciled in Hawaii, and (2) Every other individual whether domiciled in Hawaii or not, who resides in Hawaii for other than a temporary or transitory purpose. An individual domiciled outside Hawaii is presumed to be a resident if he or she spends more than 200 days in Hawaii during the taxable year. This presumption may be overcome by evidence satisfactory to the Department that the individual maintained a permanent place of abode outside the State and was in the State for a temporary or transitory purpose. No person shall be deemed to have gained or lost a residence simply because of his or her presence or absence in compliance with military or naval orders of the United States, while engaged in aviation or navigation, or while a student at any institution of learning. See Tax Information Release No. 97-1, “Determination of Residence Status.” Nonresident A Hawaii nonresident is an individual who is in Hawaii for a temporary or transient purpose, and whose permanent domicile is not Hawaii. A nonresident must file an Individual Income Tax Return—Nonresident and Part-Year Resident (Form N-15), if required to do so. A nonresident will be taxed on income from Hawaii sources only. A nonresident married to a Hawaii resident may choose to file a joint return with the resident spouse on Form N-11; however, the nonresident will then be taxed on all income from all sources. For more information, see Married Filing Joint Return on page 8. Part-Year Resident A part-year resident is an individual who was a Hawaii resident for part of the year, and who was a nonresident during the other part of the year. This includes those who moved to Hawaii during the year and those who moved away from Hawaii during the year. A part-year resident must file an Individual Income Tax Return—Nonresident and PartYear Resident (Form N-15), if required to do so. A part-year resident will be taxed on all The term “domicile” means the place where an individual has a true, fixed, permanent home and principal establishment, and to which place the individual has, whenever absent, the intention of returning. It is the place in which an individual has voluntarily fixed the habitation of himself or herself and family, not for a mere special or temporary purpose, but with the present intention of making a permanent home. Three things are necessary to create a new domicile: first, abandonment of the old domicile; second, the intent to establish a new domicile; and third, actual physical presence in the new domicile. Once a domicile is established, the intent to abandon it is not itself sufficient to create a new domicile; a new domicile must be shown. Reminder: If you are in Hawaii because of military orders and do not intend to make Hawaii your permanent home, you are not considered a Hawaii resident for income tax purposes, even though you have been in Hawaii for more than 200 days in 2020. File a resident return with your home state, and file a Hawaii nonresident and part-year resident return (Form N-15) to report your Hawaii income. Resident and Nonresident Examples Note: For more information, see Tax Information Release No. 90-3, “Income Taxation and Eligibility for Credits of an Individual Taxpayer Whose Status Changes from Resident to Nonresident or from Nonresident to Resident,” Tax Information Release No. 9010, “Clarification of Taxation and the Eligibility for Personal Exemptions and Credits of Residents and Nonresidents in the Military and Spouses and Dependents of Persons in the Military,” Tax Information Release No. 971, “Determination of Residence Status,” Tax Information Release No. 2010-01, “Military Spouses Residency Relief Act (“MSRRA”),” and Department of Taxation Announcement No. 2019-01, “Military Spouses Residency Relief Act; Amendments to the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act enacted December 31, 2018; Tax Information Release No. 2010-01.” Example 1—A Hawaii resident who enlists in the military normally will remain a Hawaii resident regardless of the length of absence from Hawaii while stationed outside of Hawaii. Example 2—A Hawaii resident working in a foreign country will remain a Hawaii resident unless permanent resident status is granted by the foreign country. Example 3—Foreign students who are granted entry into the United States on “F” visas are nonresidents for Hawaii tax purposes. Researchers and faculty members who are granted entry into the United States on “H,” “J,” or “Q” visas, and who have been in Hawaii for more than 200 days during the taxable year may be considered Hawaii residents. Example 4—Spouses of those in the military service do not become Hawaii residents if their principal reason for moving to Hawaii was the transfer of the service member spouse to Hawaii, and if it is their intention to leave Hawaii when the service member spouse either is transferred to another military station or leaves the service. Example 5—A Hawaii resident who marries a nonresident will remain a Hawaii resident unless the three requirements for changing his or her domicile are also met. (Refer to “Domicile Defined” on this page.) This situation applies in reverse to a nonresident who marries a resident. A person’s residence status will not change just because of marriage. Which Form to File You MUST use Form N-11 if: • You were a resident for the full year, or, if married filing jointly, either spouse was a resident for the full year (however, the nonresident spouse would be taxed on their worldwide income for the full year). You MUST use Form N-15 if: • You were a nonresident for the full year, or, if married filing jointly, both spouses were nonresidents for the full year. • You are taking up residence in Hawaii during the tax year. (Part-year resident). • You are giving up residence in Hawaii during the tax year. (Part-year resident). When to File Note: If any due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, use the next regular workday as the due date. You should file as soon as you can after January 1, but not later than April 20, 2021. If you file late, you may have to pay penalties and interest if you owe taxes on your return. Please see the instructions for Penalties and Interest on page 29. If you cannot meet the deadline, you are automatically granted a 6-month extension without the need to file anything with the Department unless an additional tax payment must be made. As long as the following conditions are met, you are deemed to have made an application for the 6-month extension to file an income tax return on the prescribed due date: 1. On or before April 20, 2021, 100% of the properly estimated tax liability is paid; 2. The tax return is filed on or before the expiration of the 6-month extension period; 3. The tax return is accompanied by full payment of any tax not already paid; and 4. A court has not ordered you to file the tax return on or before the prescribed due date. Properly estimated tax liability means you made a bona fide and reasonable attempt to locate and gather all of the necessary information to make a proper estimate of tax liability for the taxable year. Page 5 You may use the below worksheet to determine the amount of your income tax balance due. 1. Amount of income tax you expect to owe for the taxable year. If you do not expect to owe tax, do not complete this worksheet. ............................... 2. Hawaii income tax withheld . 3. Current year’s estimated tax payments (include prior year’s overpayment allowed as a credit)............................... 4. Other payments and tax credits ...................................... 5. Total (add lines 2, 3, and 4) ... 6. Income tax balance due (line 1 minus line 5) ............... You must pay the amount shown on line 6. If you must make an additional payment of tax on or before April 20, 2021 in order to meet the condition requiring payment of 100% of the properly estimated tax liability, file Form N-200V with your payment. The extension of time to file is not an extension of time for payment of tax. Form N-200V can be filed and payment made electronically through the State’s Internet portal. Go to tax.hawaii.gov/eservices/ for more information. Federal Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time To File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, may not be used in lieu of Form N-200V. Note: Returns for fiscal year taxpayers must be filed on or before the 20th day of the fourth month following the close of the fiscal year. Note: Under Hawaii Income Tax Law, certain tax credits must be claimed within 12 months from the close of the tax year. The official U.S. Post Office cancellation mark will be considered primary evidence of the date of filing of tax documents and payments. If you want to keep evidence that you mailed your return on time, ask your Post Office for a Certificate of Mailing. It is NOT necessary to get a certified or registered mail return receipt. Hawaii has adopted the IRC provision to allow documents and payments delivered by a designated private delivery service to qualify for the “timely mailing treated as timely filing/paying rule.” The Department will conform to the Internal Revenue Service listing of designated private delivery service and type of delivery services qualifying under this provision. Timely filing of mail which does not bear the U.S. Post Office cancellation mark or the date recorded or marked by the designated delivery service will be determined by reference to other competent evidence. The private delivery service can tell you how to get written proof of the mailing date. Where to File If you are enclosing a check or money order with your tax return, mail your return with payment to: Page 6 Hawaii Department of Taxation Attn: Payment Section P. O. Box 1530 Honolulu, Hawaii 96806-1530 If you are NOT enclosing a check or money order with your tax return, mail your return to: Hawaii Department of Taxation P. O. Box 3559 Honolulu, Hawaii 96811-3559 Where to Get Forms and Information Taxpayer Services Branch Website: tax.hawaii.gov Telephone: 808-587-4242 Toll-Free: 1-800-222-3229 Telephone for the hearing impaired: 808-587-1418 Toll-Free: 1-800-887-8974 Other Information Death of Taxpayer Did the taxpayer die before filing a return for 2020? If so, the taxpayer’s spouse or personal representative may have to file a return and sign it for the person who died (decedent) if the decedent was required to file a return. A personal representative can be an executor, administrator, or anyone who is in charge of the taxpayer’s property. If the decedent did not have to file a return but either had State income tax withheld, made estimated tax payments, or is eligible for various tax credits, a return must be filed to get a refund. If your spouse died in 2020 and you did not remarry in 2020, or if your spouse died in 2021 before filing a return for 2020, you may still file a joint return for the 2020 tax year. If a return is filed for a deceased taxpayer, including a joint return with a surviving spouse, the Deceased oval must be filled in and the date of death must be written in the boxes provided. Generally, the personal representative or other responsible individual must sign the return on behalf of the decedent. If a refund is due, Form N-110, Statement of Person Claiming Refund Due a Deceased Taxpayer, must be completed and attached to the return to ensure that the refund check will be issued in the name of the surviving spouse, personal representative, or other responsible individual instead of in the decedent’s name. A personal representative or other individual may be required to attach other documents such as the death certificate. See Form N-110 for further information. Exception for joint returns filed by surviving spouse. If a joint return is being filed by the decedent and the decedent’s spouse, the spouse should write, “Filing as surviving spouse,” on the signature line which the decedent would have signed, and then the surviving spouse should sign his or her name on the other signature line. If a refund is being claimed on the return, Form N-110 is not required. The refund check will be issued to the surviving spouse. Filing a Final Return If you are giving up your Hawaii residency at the end of the year, write the words “FINAL RETURN” on the top middle of the return. Estimated Tax Payments Purpose. You must pay income taxes as you earn income during the year, either through withholding or by making estimated tax payments. You may have to make estimated tax payments if the tax withheld from your salary is not enough, or if you receive income that is not subject to withholding, such as self-employment income, interest, dividends, rents, and capital gains. Who Must Make Estimated Tax Payments? In most cases, you must pay estimated tax for the current year if both of the following apply: (1) You expect to owe at least $500 in tax for the current year, after subtracting your withholding and credits. (2) You expect your withholding and credits to be less than the smaller of: 60% of the tax to be shown on your current year tax return, or 100% of the tax shown on your tax return for the preceding year. Your tax return for the preceding year must cover all 12 months. Note: If you did not file a tax return for the preceding year or that return did not cover all 12 months, the 100% of the tax shown on your tax return for the preceding year does not apply. Exceptions. You do not have to pay estimated tax for the current year if: 1. Your estimated tax liability (after taking into account all taxes withheld or collected at the source) for the taxable year is less than $500; or 2. You meet all of the following conditions: (1) You were a full-year Hawaii resident in the preceding year, (2) You had no tax liability for the preceding year, and (3) Your tax year covered a 12-month period. You had no tax liability for the preceding year if your total tax was zero or you were not required to file an income tax return. Note: If you were a nonresident or a part-year resident in the preceding year, you do not meet the exception under number 2. Due Dates for Estimated Tax Payments. You can pay all of your estimated tax by April 20, 2021, or in four equal amounts by April 20, 2021, June 21, 2021 September 20, 2021, and January 20, 2022. Each payment must be submitted with Form N-200V, Individual Income Tax Payment Voucher. Form N-200V can be filed and payment made electronically through the State’s Internet portal. For more information, go to tax.hawaii.gov/eservices/. Penalties. You may be charged a penalty (interest on the underpayment of estimated tax) if you do not pay enough tax through withholding and estimated tax payments, or if your estimated tax payments are late. See Penalties and Interest on page 29. For more information, see Tax Facts 201903, “Estimated Income Tax for Individuals.” Multistate Tax Compact Act Any taxpayer, other than a corporation acting as a business entity in more than one state, who is required by Hawaii Income Tax Law to file a return and whose only activities in the State consist of sales and who does not own or rent real estate or tangible personal property and whose annual gross sales in or into the State during the tax year are not in excess of $100,000, may elect to report and pay a tax of .5 percent of such annual gross sales. Taxpayers who elect the foregoing shall file Form N-310 in lieu of Form N-11. Special Instructions for Nonresident Aliens In certain situations, a taxpayer may be considered a nonresident alien for federal income tax purposes and a resident for Hawaii income tax purposes. In these situations, the special rules applicable to individuals who are considered nonresident aliens for federal income tax purposes will apply when the individual files a Hawaii resident income tax return. See Tax Information Release No. 97-1, “Determination of Residence Status.” Steps for Preparing Your Return These instructions consist of 12 steps. You should complete the first 3 steps that follow BEFORE you begin to fill in your return. Steps 4 and 5, filling in the return through line 6e, begin on this page and end on page 11. Step 6, filling in the rest of the return, is on page 11. The Line-By-Line Instructions for Form N-11 begin on page 12 and end on page 28. Finally, steps 7 through 12 begin on page 28. These are the steps you should take after your Form N-11, and other schedules and forms you need, are filled in. If you follow these steps and read the LineBy-Line Instructions, we feel you can fill in your return quickly and accurately. If you have any questions, call our Taxpayer Services staff. Step 1 Get all of your income records together. These include any Forms HW-2 and federal Forms W-2 or 1099 that you received. If you don’t receive a Form HW-2 or federal Form W-2 by January 31, or if the one you get isn’t correct, please contact your employer as soon as possible. Only your employer can give you a Form HW-2 or federal Form W-2, or correct it. If you cannot get a Form HW-2 or federal Form W-2 by February 15, please contact our Taxpayer Services staff. If you have someone prepare your return for you, make sure that person has all your income and expense records so he or she can fill in your return correctly. Remember, even if someone else prepares your return incorrectly, YOU are still responsible. Step 2 If you plan to claim tax credits or itemize deductions, get the information and expense records you need. These instructions tell you what credits and deductions you can claim. Some of the records you may need are: • Medical and dental payment records. • Real estate and income tax receipts. • Interest payment records for a home mortgage. • Receipts for charitable contributions. Step 3 Get all forms, instructions, and publications you need. All forms, instructions, and publications you need are available on the Internet. You may also pick them up at any district tax office or request that they be mailed to you. Please allow approximately 10 days for the mailing of the tax forms. See page 6 for Department’s website address and phone number. Step 4 Fill in the oval(s) if you are filing an amended return. If you are filing an amended return, fill in the amended return oval at the top of Form N-11. If you are filing an amended return due to a farming net operating loss carryback, also fill in the NOL Carryback oval. If you are filing an amended return due to an IRS adjustment, also fill in the IRS Adjustment oval. See page 29 of the instructions for more information. Step 5 Fill in your tax year, first time filer oval, name, address, social security number, filing status, and exemptions. Tax Year, First Time Filer If you are filing your return on a fiscal year basis, you must fill in the dates that your fiscal year begins and ends. If you are filing a tax return for the first time, fill in the “First Time Filer” oval at the top of Form N-11. Name Write your name, and your spouse’s name if you are married and filing a joint return, in the space provided and at the top of Form N-11, pages 2, 3, and 4. You must use your legal name. Nicknames are not permitted. If you have changed your name because of marriage, divorce, etc., make sure you immediately notify the Social Security Administration so that the name on your tax return is the same as the name on the social security records. If these names do not match, your refund may be delayed. If you file joint returns, write the names in the same order every year. Write any descriptions (e.g., Jr., III, etc.) in the space provided for the suffix. You must also write the first four letters of your last name in the boxes provided. If you are married, you must also write the first four letters of your spouse’s last name in the boxes provided whether joint or separate returns are filed. Address Write your current mailing address in the space provided. If you receive your mail “in care of” someone else (i.e., your mail is sent to an address belonging to someone other than yourself), fill in that person’s name in the space provided. If your address is outside the United States or its possessions or territories, enter the city in the space provided for “City, town or post office,” and enter the postal code in the space provided for “Postal/ZIP code.” Enter the province and/or state, and the name of the country in the space provided. Do not abbreviate the country name. If your mailing address has changed, you must notify the Department of the change by completing Form ITPS-COA, Change of Address Form, or log in to your Hawaii Tax Online account at hitax.hawaii.gov. Failure to do so may prevent your address from being updated, any refund due to you from being delivered (the U.S. Postal Service is not permitted to forward your State refund check), and delay important notices or correspondence to you regarding your return. Social Security Number Write your social security number in the space provided. If you are married, you must also write your spouse’s social security number in the space provided whether joint or separate returns are filed. Your social security numbers must be written in the same order as your names are written on your return. Also enter your social security number, and your spouse’s social security number if you are married and filing a joint return, at the top of Form N-11, pages 2, 3, and 4. If you are an alien and was issued an individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN) by the IRS, enter your ITIN in the space provided for the social security number. If you have applied for an ITIN but the IRS has not yet issued the ITIN, write “ITIN Applied For” in the space below the “THIS SPACE RESERVED” box. Filing Status Fill in oval 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 as appropriate. Fill in only one oval. Page 7 Note: Civil union couples have the same tax filing status options as married couples. Note: More than one filing status may apply to you. Choose the one that will give you the lowest tax. Your Hawaii filing status may or may not be the same as your federal filing status. Single Note: Civil union couples may not choose “single” as their filing status. You can fill in oval 1 if any of the following was true on December 31, 2020. • You were never married. • You were legally separated according to your state’s law under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance. But if, at the end of 2020, your divorce was not final (an interlocutory decree), you are considered married and cannot fill in oval 1. • You were widowed before January 1, 2020, and did not remarry before the end of 2020. If you have a child, you may be able to use the qualifying widow(er) filing status. See Qualifying Widow(er) on page 9. If you are unmarried and provide a home for certain other persons, you may be able to file as Head of Household. See Head of Household on this page. Married Filing Joint Return You can fill in oval 2 if any of the following apply. • You were married at the end of 2020, even if you did not live with your spouse at the end of 2020. • Your spouse died in 2020 and you did not remarry in 2020. • You were married at the end of 2020, and your spouse died in 2021 before filing a 2020 return. If you are married and file a joint return, both you and your spouse must report all of your income, exemptions, deductions, and credits on your joint return. You can file a joint return even if only one of you had income or if you did not live together all year. However, both of you must sign the return. If you file a joint return, both you and your spouse are generally responsible for the tax, interest, and penalties due on the return. This means that if one spouse does not pay the tax due, the other may have to. Note: If you and your spouse file a joint return for the year and later decide to file separately, both you and your spouse MUST file amended returns on or before the due date of the original return (April 20). You may not change your filing status from married filing jointly to married filing separately after that date. dent, you may choose to file a joint return with your resident spouse. By filing a joint return, however, you and your spouse will be taxed on your combined worldwide income for the entire year. Special Rule for Nonresidents or Part-Year Residents Who File a Joint Return With a PartYear Resident on Form N-15. If at the end of the taxable year you were a nonresident (but you were a U.S. resident) or a part-year resident who is married to a part-year resident, you may choose to file a joint return with your part-year resident spouse. By filing a joint return, you and your spouse will be taxed on your combined worldwide income for the period in which the part-year resident is a Hawaii resident. Special Rule for Nonresident Aliens and Dual-Status Aliens. Generally, a married couple cannot file a joint return if either spouse is a nonresident alien at any time during the year. However, if you were a nonresident alien or a dual-status alien and were married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien at the end of 2020, you can elect to be treated as a resident alien and file a joint federal return. See federal Publication 519 for details. If you and your spouse have made that election on your federal return, you also may choose to file a joint Hawaii return. By filing a joint return, you and your spouse will be taxed on your combined worldwide income. Note: For purposes of filing a joint return, common law marriages are not recognized under Hawaii law unless they began in a state which permits common law marriages. Married Filing Separate Return If you are married and file a separate return, you generally report only your own income, exemptions, deductions, and credits. Generally, you are responsible only for the tax on your own income. However, you will usually pay more tax than if you use another filing status for which you qualify. Also, if you file a separate return, you cannot take the student loan interest deduction or the earned income tax credit. You also cannot take the standard deduction if your spouse itemizes deductions. If you file a separate return, write your spouse’s full name in the space after oval 3. Also write the first four letters of your spouse’s last name and your spouse’s social security number in the boxes provided. If your spouse does not file a Hawaii tax return, you may be able to claim the exemption for your spouse. See the instructions for line 6b. If your spouse died in 2020 or in 2021 before filing a return for 2020, see Death of Taxpayer on page 6. If you were married in 2020, had a child living with you, and lived apart from your spouse during the last six months of 2020, you may be able to file as Head of Household. See Married persons who live apart on page 9. Special Rule for Nonresidents or Part-Year Residents Who File a Joint Return With a Hawaii Resident on Form N-11. If at the end of the taxable year you were a nonresident (but you were a U.S. resident) or a part-year resident who is married to a full-year Hawaii resi- Special Rule for Nonresident Aliens and Dual-Status Aliens. Married nonresident aliens must file separate returns. However, if you were a nonresident alien or a dual-status alien and were married to a U.S. citizen or resident alien at the end of 2020, you can elect to be Page 8 treated as a resident alien and file a joint federal return. See federal Publication 519 for details. If you and your spouse have made that election on your federal return, you also may choose to file a joint Hawaii return. By filing a joint return, you and your spouse will be taxed on your combined worldwide income. Head of Household Note: Since this filing status is for unmarried individuals who provide a home for certain other persons, a person in a civil union may not choose “head of household” as their filing status. However, a person in a civil union may file as “head of household” if the person is considered unmarried because they lived apart from their civil union partner for the last six months of 2020 and they meet the other rules under Married persons who live apart on page 9. This filing status is for unmarried individuals who provide a home for certain other persons. You are considered unmarried for this purpose if any of the following applies. • You were legally separated according to your state’s law under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance at the end of 2020. But if, at the end of 2020, your divorce was not final (an interlocutory decree), you are considered married. • You are married but lived apart from your spouse for the last six months of 2020 and you meet the other rules under Married persons who live apart on page 9. • You are married to a nonresident alien at any time during the year and you do not choose to treat him or her as a resident alien. Fill in the oval on line 4 only if you are unmarried (or considered unmarried) and either Test 1 or Test 2 applies. Test 1. You paid over half the cost of keeping up a home that was the main home for all of 2020 of your parent whom you can claim as a dependent, except under a multiple support agreement (see page 11). Your parent did not have to live with you. Test 2. You paid over half the cost of keeping up a home in which you lived and in which one of the following also lived for more than half of the year (if half or less, see Exception to time lived with you on page 9). 1. Any person whom you can claim as a dependent. But do not include: a. Your child whom you claim as your dependent because of the rule for Children of divorced or separated parents on page 10, b. Any person who is your dependent only because he or she lived with you for all of 2020, or c. Any person you claimed as a dependent under a multiple support agreement. See page 11. 2. Your unmarried qualifying child who is not your dependent. 3. Your married qualifying child who is not your dependent only because you can be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s 2020 return. 4. Your qualifying child who, even though you are the custodial parent, is not your dependent because of the rule for Children of divorced or separated parents on page 10. If the child is not claimed as your dependent, enter the child’s name on line 4. Qualifying child. To find out if someone is your qualifying child, see Step 1 of the line 6c instructions on this page. Dependent. To find out if someone is your dependent, see the instructions for line 6c that begin on this page. Exception to time lived with you. Temporary absences by you or the other person for special circumstances, such as school, vacation, business, medical care, military service, or detention in a juvenile facility, count as time lived in the home. Also see Kidnapped child on page 11, if applicable. If the person for whom you kept up a home was born or died in 2020, you still may be able to file as head of household. If the person is your qualifying child, the child must have lived with you for more than half the part of the year he or she was alive. If the person is anyone else, see federal Publication 501. Keeping up a home. To find out what is included in the cost of keeping up a home, see federal Publication 501. Special Rule for Nonresident Aliens and Dual-Status Aliens.—If you were a nonresident alien or dual-status alien during the tax year, you cannot file as Head of Household. Married persons who live apart. Even if you were not divorced or legally separated at the end of 2020, you are considered unmarried if all of the following apply. • You lived apart from your spouse for the last six months of 2020. Temporary absences for special circumstances, such as for business, medical care, school, or military service, count as time lived in the home. • You file a separate return from your spouse. • You paid over half the cost of keeping up your home for 2020. • Your home was the main home of your child, stepchild, or foster child for more than half of 2020 (if half or less, see Exception to time lived with you on this page). • You can claim this child as your dependent or could claim the child except that the child’s other parent can claim him or her under the rule for Children of divorced or separated parents on page 10. Adopted child. An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption. Foster child. A foster child is any child placed with you by an authorized placement agency or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court of competent jurisdiction. Special Rule for Nonresident Aliens and Dual-Status Aliens.—If you were a nonresident alien or dual-status alien during the tax year, the special rules for Married persons who live apart will not apply to you unless you meet all of the tests previously stated, and you are a resident of Canada or Mexico. If you are considered unmarried under these rules, you may file as a single individual. You cannot file as Head of Household. status, and not the election that some nonresident aliens make to be taxed as U.S. residents. Qualifying Widow(er) Fill in the oval on line 6a if no one can claim you as a dependent on another person’s tax return. If you can be claimed as a dependent on another person’s tax return, do not fill in the oval on line 6a. Instead, fill in the oval above line 21. Fill in the oval for “Age 65 or over” if you are age 65 or over as of January 1, 2021. You can fill in oval 5 and use joint return tax rates for 2020 if all of the following apply. • Your spouse died in 2018 or 2019 and you did not remarry before the end of 2020. • You have a child or stepchild (not a foster child) whom you can claim as a dependent or could claim as a dependent except that, for 2020: – The child had gross income of $4,300 or more, – The child filed a joint return, or – You could be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s return. If the child isn’t claimed as your dependent on line 6c, enter the child’s name on line 4. • This child lived in your home for all of 2020. If the child did not live with you for the required time, see Exception to time lived with you, below. • You paid over half the cost of keeping up your home. • You could have filed a joint return with your spouse the year he or she died, even if you did not actually do so. If your spouse died in 2020, you cannot file as qualifying widow(er). Instead, see the instructions for Married Filing Joint Return on page 8. Adopted child. An adopted child is always treated as your own child. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption. Dependent. To find out if someone is your dependent, see the instructions for line 6c that begin on this page. Exception to time lived with you. Temporary absences by you or the child for special circumstances, such as school, vacation, business, medical care, military service, or detention in a juvenile facility, count as time lived in the home. Also see Kidnapped child on page 11, if applicable. Exemptions Line 6a Yourself Line 6b Spouse Fill in the oval on line 6b if either of the following applies. 1. Your filing status is married filing jointly and your spouse cannot be claimed as a dependent on another person’s return. 2. You were married at the end of 2020, your filing status is married filing separately, and both of the following apply. a. Your spouse had no income and is not filing a return. b. Your spouse cannot be claimed as a dependent on another person’s return. If your spouse meets these qualifications, fill in the oval under line 6b. If you became divorced or legally separated during 2020, you cannot take an exemption for your former spouse. Fill in the oval for “Age 65 or over” if your spouse was age 65 or over as of January 1, 2021 and your filing status is married filing jointly. Death of your spouse. If your spouse died in 2020 and you did not remarry by the end of 2020, fill in the ovals on line 6b for the exemptions you could have taken for your spouse on the date of death. See the instructions for Death of Taxpayer on page 6. Enter the number of ovals filled on lines 6a and 6b. Lines 6c and 6d Children and Other Dependents Keeping up a home. To find out what is included in the cost of keeping up a home, see federal Publication 501. Enter on lines 6c and 6d the full names, social security numbers, and relationship for your dependent children and other dependents. Each dependent must have a social security number. If you have more than four dependents, attach a statement with the required information. Enter the number of your dependent children in the box for line 6c. Enter the number of other dependents in the box for line 6d. Note: See Death of Taxpayer on page 6 for more information. Follow the steps below to find out if a person qualifies as your dependent. A child is considered to have lived with you for all of 2020 if the child was born or died in 2020 and your home was the child’s home for the entire time he or she was alive. Special Rule for Nonresident Aliens and Dual-Status Aliens.—The special rules for Qualifying Widow(er) will not apply unless the surviving spouse meets all of the tests previously stated, and was a resident alien or U.S. citizen the year their spouse died. The residency status refers to the surviving spouse’s actual Step 1 Do You Have a Qualifying Child? A qualifying child is a child who is your: • Son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister, half brother, half sister, or a descendant of any Page 9 of them (for example, your grandchild, niece, or nephew), and • Was under age 19 at the end of 2020 and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly), or under age 24 at the end of 2020, a student, and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly), or any age and permanently and totally disabled, and • Who did not provide over half of his or her own support for 2020, and • Who is not filing a joint return for 2
Extracted from PDF file 2020-hawaii-income-tax-instructions.pdf, last modified September 2007

More about the Hawaii Income Tax Instructions Individual Income Tax TY 2020

This booklet includes instructions for filling out your Form N-11 as well as answers to frequently asked questions about your Hawaii tax return.

We last updated the Hawaii Income Tax Instruction Booklet in February 2021, so this is the latest version of Income Tax Instructions, fully updated for tax year 2020. You can download or print current or past-year PDFs of Income Tax Instructions directly from TaxFormFinder. You can print other Hawaii tax forms here.

Other Hawaii Individual Income Tax Forms:

TaxFormFinder has an additional 164 Hawaii income tax forms that you may need, plus all federal income tax forms.

Form Code Form Name
Form N-11 Individual Income Tax Return (Resident Form)
Form N-200V Individual Income Tax Payment Voucher
Form N-15 Individual Income Tax Return (Nonresidents and Part Year Residents)
Form N-288C Application for Tentative Refund of Withholding on Dispositions by Nonresident Persons on Property Interest
Form N-288A Statement of Withholding on Dispositions by Nonresident Persons on Property Interest

Download all HI tax forms View all 165 Hawaii Income Tax Forms


Form Sources:

Hawaii usually releases forms for the current tax year between January and April. We last updated Hawaii Income Tax Instructions from the Department of Taxation in February 2021.

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About the Individual Income Tax

The IRS and most states collect a personal income tax, which is paid throughout the year via tax withholding or estimated income tax payments.

Most taxpayers are required to file a yearly income tax return in April to both the Internal Revenue Service and their state's revenue department, which will result in either a tax refund of excess withheld income or a tax payment if the withholding does not cover the taxpayer's entire liability. Every taxpayer's situation is different - please consult a CPA or licensed tax preparer to ensure that you are filing the correct tax forms!

Historical Past-Year Versions of Hawaii Income Tax Instructions

We have a total of six past-year versions of Income Tax Instructions in the TaxFormFinder archives, including for the previous tax year. Download past year versions of this tax form as PDFs here:


2020 Income Tax Instructions

Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2020

2019 Income Tax Instructions

Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2019

2018 Income Tax Instructions

Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2018

2017 Income Tax Instructions

Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2017

2016 Income Tax Instructions

Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2015

Forms 2015 2015 Income Tax Instructions

Instructions for Form N-11 Rev 2015


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